ROLLING STONES Sticky Fingers LP ZIP COVER VERY 1st UK PRESS 1971 1 PLAY MINT - rare vinyl collector item


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ROLLING STONES Sticky Fingers LP~ZIP COVER VERY 1st UK PRESS 1971, 1 PLAY, MINT

ROLLING STONES Sticky Fingers LPZIP COVER VERY 1st UK PRESS 1971 1 PLAY MINT
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Auction Details:
Code ID
#12746
Ebay Item #
252381932490
Sold Price
$829.88
Bids
29
Auction End date
14 May 2016
Seller Location
Chelmsford, Essex

Item Description

"SISTER MORPHINE" (Mick Jagger / Keith Richards / Marianne Faithfull, 1968)
  Here I lie in my hospital bed,
Tell me, Sister Morphine,  "When are you coming round again?"
Oh, I don't think I can wait that long,
Oh, you see that I'm not that strong.
The scream of the ambulance is sounding in my ears,
Tell me, Sister Morphine, "How long have I been lying here?"
What am I doing in this place?
Why does the doctor have no face?
Oh, I can't crawl across the floor,
Ah, can't you see, Sister Morphine, I'm trying to score.
Well it just goes to show, things are not what they seem,
Please, Sister Morphine, turn my nightmares into dreams.
Oh, can't you see I'm fading fast and that this shot will be my last?
Sweet Cousin Cocaine, lay your cool cool hand on my head,
Ah, come on, Sister Morphine, you better make up my bed.
'Cause you know and I know, in the morning I'll be dead.
Yeah, and you can sit around, yeah, and you can watch all the
Clean white sheets stained red.

ROLLING STONES: "Sticky Fingers" LP. VERY FIRST UK PRESSING, 1st MAY 1971.
ROLLING STONES RECORDS LABEL: COC 59100.
MAITRIX:  COC- 59100 - A4  /  COC 59100 - B - 3
  The correct maitrix for UK very first pressings, the lowest end digits I have ever seen was the same a this record's  'A4 / B3,'
anything lower will be one of the uncountable re-issues, they did start at '- A1' & '1 B1.'  Machine stamped by CBS at the
12 o'clock position as usual, a very common feature of the stamping was a streaky effect, making it hard to read but I did
take pictures that are just about legible, the same effect is on the handwritten Rolling Stones' new label logo at 6 o'clock:
'TML    Rolling Stones Records'
UNUSED FIRST ISSUE THICKER, PICTURE & CREDITS DOUBLE SIDED INSERT, IN MINT- CONDITION
Making it's first appearance on a Rolling Stones album, one side has the huge red lips and tongue logo, printed above the track
listing with full details and comprehensive album credits.  The reverse side has a full size picture of the Stones, in unused condition,
uncreased, unhandled with all the edges crisp and flat, showing no ageing at all, just a gentle record impression.  First issues were
made from thicker matt card than the flimsier paper of the later printed inserts.  Printed on the bottom right corner on one side is;
"Printed In England By Richard Davis Ltd."
 
RARE VERY FIRST 1971 WARNER BROS. INNER SLEEVE, EXCLUSIVE TO FIRST PRESSINGS, CURVED EDGES WITHOUT
A DIE-CUT CENTRE.  THIS IS A 1970 TYPE AND THE LAST REMAINING FEW WERE USED ON THE VERY FIRST PRESSINGS,
LIKE THE DIE-CUT CENTRE SLEEVE'S FOLLOWING DESIGN, THE FRONT BOTTOM RIM HAS HAS THE PATENT NUMBER
AND "Made In England" PRINTED IN A PALE BLUE COLOUR.
As this is the earliest possible pressing, as mentioned the 1970 inner sleeves were still being used until they were gone,
replaced by a similar sleeve with a die-cut centre.  The 1970 -  April 1971 earliest sleeves, were distinctively and uniquely
  shaped,the top and bottom meeting points with the curved corners, finish with points.  Made from soft paper, printed on the
front bottom edge, the light blue text, "Made In England" and the Patent number, was retained for the inner sleeves made in 1971.
 
STRICTLY FIRST ISSUE ONLY, TOP OPENING REAL ZIP COVER, IN OUTSTANDING CONDITION.  EASILY IDENTIFIED
AS A FIRST ISSUE,THE LEFT HAND SPINE WITH THE PRINTED TITLES, IS ALSO IN THE UNIQUE SHAPE FOUND IN
  THE 1960's DECADE AND EARLY 1970's.   THE ENDING'S ARE TAPERED INTO POINTS, WITH THE MAIN PART FLAT
IN BETWEEN.  THERE WERE NO EXCEPTIONS TO THIS IN MAY, 1971 FOR GENUINE FIRST PRESSINGS, BECAUSE ALL
FOLLOWING COVERS CAME WITH STANDARD, UNIFORM SPINES.
The matt cover is totally unyellowed, unstained, unscuffed & unfaded, giving a stunning insight into how the covers first looked
in the Spring of 1971.  The belt at the top of the cover is a thin die-cut strip of card and virtually every original and re-issue
have a map like system of very heavy creases.  Becoming the weakest point of the cover, particularly on the joining section and
  once heavily creased and weakened, like perforation, that was always in real danger of tearing clean off and most did!
I have taken close up pictures of the zip, it should, it looks like brand new, so does the top crisp edges of the die-cut belt.
   I could only find one, near invisible ultra fine paper line on that top thinnest part of the belt, often so badly damaged they are
  no longer on the cover!  I decided against opening the zip due to the fantastic condition, taking pictures for the sake of it is
  not how I treat covers of this complexity and extreme vulnerability to wear.  I must stress this is a once only played record and
   the cover has not been used since May, 1971, an astounding 45 years ago, it's unreal to see that entire area around the zip
  completely unworn and exactly how it left the factory all those decades ago, in fact there is not really any wear beyond the
  initial factory packaging, distribution to record shop and one record removal and replacement.  As anyone with a real zip cover
  from brand new in 1971, the zip itself scratched the back of the cover in front, when packaged without any form of a cardboard
  divider, just treated like a standard cover.  Then the problem of the full length zip against the record, causing scratches and
  indentations, fortunately the thick insert was between the zip and the inner sleeve & record, no indentations or deep scratches,
  just a couple or ultra thin feather light, traces that are no different to virtually every record's factory handling.   Usually that deep
  impression and scratches from the zip damaged both sides due to constantly differing side replacements, as a once only played
  record and that one replacement being made to the same side, the reverse side does not have any traces from the zip at all or
  any factory handling traces.  This very first pressing is a real exception to the common rule, the back has a zip impression of
from the cover directly behind when packed in a delivery box. The same would have applied to the matching position on the
  vinyl, had it been regularly played, I have never seen such minute zip impression, this was perfectly stored in a plastic outer
  sleeve ever since with the greatest care taken not to allow any pressure against the cover.  I recommend seeing the pictures,
  especially the amazing  close up of the 'belt', the zip fastener and the most vulnerable sections of the top edge.
The zip, in particular the fastener, has an untarnished, unrusted shining brass colour, Mint condition applies to an as new zip.
 Do I really have to say the record pictures were  not taken on the front because of the zip?  I will point out both sides were
placed on the back cover, not easy to read but you only need to look for the Stones red logo position on the labels,an explanation
will be given fully below.
The pointed spine endings /left side corners, have no more than a little standing pressure signs and brushing and the same applies to
the outstanding bottom edge. The main part of the actual spine is absolutely perfect with superbly clear unworn black titles, and so
is the untitled right side or second spine.  The right side top corner is perfectly square shaped and only has  the slightest brushing.
The factory assembling was difficult to say the least,gluing an actual zip to cardboard was hardly a normal procedure  for an
LP cover, then the record insertion, packaging and distribution, record shop storage and handling, all before they were sold, so
allowances must be made for such an unusual cover from 1971, my grading most certainly will include that, but because I did buy
"Sticky Fingers" in May, 1971, I am in the perfect position to know how the first edition covers looked like when first bought.
The back is in just as superbly clean condition as the front, as mentioned, there is the usual central indentation from the original
factory boxing of the albums, there before the album even reached the record shop.
A FANTASTIC FIRST ISSUE "Sticky Fingers" COVER, IN MINT- CONDITION.
 
THE LABELS ARE IMMACULATE WITH ONLY ONE SPINDLE ALIGNMENT TRACE, APART FROM THE MENTIONED ULTRA
LIGHT, NEAR INVISIBLE  ZIP TRACE, THERE ARE NO MARKS AT ALL,THAT EVEN INCLUDES NO HANDLING TRACES
ON THE SIDE FACING AWAY FROM THE ZIP.  
THE RECORD IS IN ONCE PLAYED, MINT CONDITION.

SIDE 1
"Brown Sugar"
"Sway"
"Wild Horses"
"Can't You Hear Me Knocking"
"You Gotta Move" (Fred McDowell / Rev. Gary Davis)
SIDE 2
"Bitch"
"I Got The Blues"
"Sister Morphine" (Mick Jagger / Keith Richards / Marianne Faithfull, 1968)
> "Dead Flowers"
"Moonlight Mile"
Mick Jagger -  vocals, acoustic guitar & percussion
Keith Richards - electric & acoustic guitars & vocals
Mick Taylor - electric & acoustic guitars & slide guitar
Bill Wyman - bass & electric piano
Charlie Watts - drums
 
Nicky Hopkins - piano
  Ian Stewart - piano
  Billy Preston - organ
  Jim Dickinson - piano
  Nicky Hopkins - piano
  Jack Nitzsche - piano
  Ry Cooder - slide guitar
  Bobby Keys - saxophone
  Jim Price - trumpet & piano
Rocky Dijon - congas
  Jimmy Miller - percussion
  Paul Buckmaster - string arrangement
 
All Songs Written By Mick Jagger & Keith Richards, Except Where Credited.
Recorded On The Rolling Stones Mobile Studio & Olympic Studios, The Recording Dates Range From;
December 1969, February - July 1970, October 1970 & January 1971.
"Sister Morphine" Was Started But Not Finished In March 1969.
Sound Engineers - Glyn Johns & Andy Johns
Produced By Jimmy Miller

 

After spending the whole of the 1960's decade with only the one record company, the Rolling Stones left Decca to found their own
record label in 1970.   The Beatles and the Moody Blues had been the first 1960's UK bands to seek independence and set up their
their own record company, in reality though the pressing and distribution side of records still needed the long established large
organisations to handle that side of vinyl production & distribution.  It was not until the following year the first LP released
on the 'Rolling Stones Records' label in May, 1971, was one worth waiting for, the magnificent "Sticky Fingers".  The year long
delay in releasing a new album was due to Mick Jagger venturing into acting, he undertook roles in two films,"Performance" and
"Ned Kelly".  The recording and writing for "Sticky Fingers"was spread over two years, well three really, because that build up
of new material included an inspired song, co-written with Marianne Faithful during the 1968,"Beggar's Banquet" album recording
sessions, when an early version of the outstanding"Sister Morphine" was taped but left unreleased.  The "Sticky Fingers" version
was returned to in March, 1969, just how spread out the recordings were is detailed above, how different that was to the earlier
albums with very tight schedules to stick to.  The whole recording industry had been transformed during that decade of wonder and
the late 1960's had also instigated album covers being turned from functional storage sleeves, into extravagant works of art, the
Stones own "Their Satanic Majesties Request" was the supreme example of how psychedelia changed the concept of a record's
  sleeve.  "Led Zeppelin 3" had carried that flag into 1970 with a rotatable wheel that allowed different colour pictures to appear
in die-cut circles, by 1971 the covers were just starting to revert back to being a little bland, unimaginative and a bit boring.
  Apart from a few exceptions they were again becoming just a functional way to hold the records and read the credits and tracks
  etc. from.... then along came "Sticky Fingers"!   Legendary artist Andy Warhol designed this stunning cover, becoming one of the
most unique of all time.  The back and front had a male torso from the waist down wearing jeans, with the belt die-cut shaped to
open out and directly underneath that was a real metal zip fastener. Like any radical design for an album cover, there were a few
  design changes made while the printers prepared them for the album's release date.  There were two UK variations to the design
and the materials, as only a few were made and both are extremely rare.  A few of the first covers made with a larger zip but the
cost of producing the cover immediately saw a smaller zip used on virtually all the UK first issues and every following pressing.
Bigger zips Caused bigger damage to the records, although economics count, big zips made factory packaging as difficult as the
record shop would have experienced.   There was an experimental design, opening out like a gatefold cover, so the picture printed
  behind the zip could be fully accessed, but it was not practical and that design was dropped in favour of a glued together cover,
  with a top opening.  The standard issue 1971 cover was a stunning item but for long term use, obviously extremely vulnerable to
  being ripped and torn on the front top and  the die-cut belt above the zip.  Placing an actual metal zip on a record cover was a
  novelty item that was constantly unzipped and re-zipped, causing even further damage to the front.  A matt unlaminated surface
wore very poorly and with the average plays to the record, the handling that involved has left most of the 1971 "Sticky Fingers"
covers worn out  and battered, unless the worst possible uncaring storage was to blame. I have listed and sold all the variations
on ebay and I do my best to include all possible information, I always mentioned how the covers & vinyl had to have an indentation
from the zips but this time I was amazed to find this record virtually escaped that and only has a tiny impression.  Events around
"Sticky Fingers" first appearing in a UK record shop was common to every country in the world except Spain, where the design was
not permitted and the famous 'tin can' took the innuendo away from an LP titled 'Sticky Fingers' and undoing the zip on the jeans.
   
  The most thoughtless stacking and distribution in the history of rock LP covers began at the printer and the pressing plant, the
covers were tightly packed without anything placed between the metal zips and backs of the next covers pressed tightly up against
them.  With cardboard boxes stacked on top of each other, the pressure forced the zips into the adjacent covers and the back of
the zip into the vinyl, such utter stupidity went unchecked until the record shop owners complained about them arriving with deep
damaging zip indentations. By then it was too late but the shops still had the problem of storing the large amount they ordered
and needed to meet the demands of such a huge selling Stones album, in effect, their first new studio recordings for two years.
  The indented and often torn covers with scratched records were accepted when we bought them, but the increased damage to
 the vinyl needed urgent protection from the zips.  It was solved by pulling the zips down to place the biggest culprit of all,
the protruding pull tabs, were than positioned against the labels in the centre of the cover, only now there was the increased
wear you will regularly see to the areas around the zips, including the 'belt' at the top.  These covers were bought as brand new
in May, 1971, but they all  had zip indentations and if anyone was wondering why the positions on the back & on the front do not
correspond to the closed position of the zips, it was to protect the vinyl and leave the opened zip fastener against the labels
internally, but externally it was either against the centre of the front or back of the cover alongside.  Personally I place the
full blame onto the Rolling Stones for not supervising their first album on their own label, no way would Decca have allowed the
obvious damage to the covers or to the vinyl inside them. I will return to that subject later on, this cover has the most minimal
and minor effect from the zip, plus the normally mass of creases and sever wear to the belt does not apply here,  like brand new
and just as miraculously, the record barely even has any of the zip's pressure, let alone the normal heavy indentations and even
deep scratches.
  This is a stunning all round condition,1971 first pressing, once again proving the formula of a once played record was vital to
the survival of all the items in top condition.  However prone a cover is to damage, that formula is accurate because this Mint
  record has a Mint- zip cover, a Mint- insert and not forgetting an unique inner sleeve also in superb condition. A rare event for
  Mint a genuine first issue, 45 year old "Sticky Fingers," I mentioned two extremely rare experimental designs for the zip cover
  but for first issues there was a very distinctive feature exclusive to the May, 1971 covers.  A top opening cover does create two
  spines and the left side was the actual spine, in terms of having the LP title and the catalogue number printed. Typical of the late
  1960's and early 1970's, the main part was flat and the ending's were pointed or pleated, the re-issues have a standard shape
  spine.  I will describe this in full after the record, in my experience this cover is much tougher for condition than any of the 60's
  Stones albums.
 
  "Sticky Fingers" became the first LP with the famous "tongue & lips" logo, that was designed by John Pasche, although an artist
in America is claiming he designed it. Well, that is not true, in 1970 the young British artist John Pasche, was given the job by
Mick Jagger, who was delighted with the suggestive logo, so delighted it has never been changed to this day. I mentioned
in my headings,"Rolling Stones Records" is hand etched in the run-out grooves. T hat red logo is not found on the front cover, it
was  almost hidden away on the back bottom left corner, I am dealing with printing details but I cannot help returning to the
staggering condition of this particular first edition, it still has the original 1971 starchy stiffness thanks to non-usage of the
record and perfect storage inside a plastic outer sleeve, essential to still looking so stunning all those decades later.   This is
pure trivia, first pressing labels have the red logo in different positions, Side 1 has the red tongue' licking the spindle hole,
Side 2 has it on the outside rim at 1 o'clock, 'licking' the word,"Sticky," enough said!
Leaving aside such a beautiful cover, this is "Sticky Fingers" and the most important part about this first issue is the record
being in such incredible condition. 'Rolling Stones Records' were part of  Warner / Atlantic Record Company, the first thing to
establish about their 1970's catalogue number is the pre-fix.   The first issues and the early part of the decade had the first
used, 'COC' pre-fix  as 'COC 59100', the Rolling Stones sense of humour and the freedom of having their own label to do  as they
pleased, saw the the later 1970's issues with a 'CUN' pre-fix.   Normally for an unplayed record of such massive rarity, I consider
offering it unplayed by myself, but I cannot do that for "Sticky Fingers" or the next two 'Rolling Stones Records' albums, "Exile"
and "Goat Head's Soup."  I will need to make the same comments made recently about an equally stunning Mint first pressing of
"Goat Head's Soup," referring back to me blaming the Rolling Stones for not doing as Jimmy Page did and still does on behalf of
Led Zeppelin, making sure their fans has only the best quality packaging, mastering, pressing, vinyl and sound quality.
 
Over our long years spent selling this album , including while trading on ebay since 2001, I have bought many, many atrocious
sounding first issues of "Sticky Fingers," there were definitely poor pressings made for the first pressings and re-issues alike.
  They have terrible crackles and distortion, as for "Sister Morphine," a very quietly played acoustic masterpiece sounds horrific!
  If they were all pressed that poorly, fair enough, that was how they came, but like the other 70's Rolling Stones titles, there were
absolutely perfect pressings made, I will add here I played this record before embarking on taking pictures and all the text typed
so far. This record is one of the truly stunning sound ing first pressings and I was blown away by the sheer power and perfect
  audio clarity, played once, without even knowing it contained a first generation Master Tape transfer of the absolutely stunning
  varietal.   I believe in being honest about records,it might have taken me four years since my last sale, but the next had to be
a perfect sounding first pressing.  Normally the heavyweight vinyl of 1971 would guarantee audio perfection, but great care is
required to make sure 'all that glitters is gold...!   I recoil in horror how other sellers slap visual grading's onto vinyl that should
  have been and probably were returned to record shops in 1971.  Needless to say, this "Sticky Fingers" had my closest attention
  to the sound quality and I was mightily impressed!  This is indeed "Sticky Fingers" as perfectly pressed as vinyl gets, with the
  staggering sound quality I  never have and never will compromise over, with such minimal minor and insignificant static, it's not
worth discussing, but I will just the same!   After Decca made sure all the Stones LP's had deluxe lamination in the 60's and did
the same in the 1970's for "Ya-Ya's" and most their compilations, fans deserved a continuation of that, "Led Zeppein 3 "was given
lamination for the die-cut wheel cover,"Sticky Fingers" should also have been protected.   As for allowing poor quality control of
the record's pressings, they once again let down fans who were accustomed to Decca's staggering quality control, surely just a
simple square of cardboard placed between the albums was not too much to ask.  You can't turn the clock back, but as one of the
earliest fans, you will only ever read the truth in my descriptions, I will only sell these first pressings when they do reach the
incredible audio standard I know is possible.  Back in 1971 I returned three copies of "Sticky Fingers" to my record shop and it
was the fourth I kept because the sound was as perfect as this record.   My plays are made with a fanatically changed stylus and
I am as fanatical about 100% aligning the centre holes to a stylus and can't wait to  hear the album again, I will type as much
info as possible during the second  play, I felt it was essential to check the sound reproduction, all part of the service.
Side 1 has near silent run-in grooves, no crackles at all and hardly any low level static, tells me this record was positively
  mastered from a perfect 'mother', amazing really, how 45 years later I have to review the actual pressing before I consider the
record worthy to offer for sale.  So that means a perfectly clean and crackle free entrance for Keith's very emphatic and superb
  guitar riff intro to "Brown Sugar."  Powering out in simply stunning audio clarity, a classic of a Rolling Stones track that they
first attempted during the 1969 "Let It Bleed" recording sessions, the lyrics were different but Keith's original guitar riff was
  unchanged. This was the dawn of the new Rolling Stones sound, augmented by the use of brass that Stax fans instantly recognise
as being a major influence pre-psychedelia, the 1970's were ready to rock!  The 60's Stones' sound connections was just as strong
as ever.  This fuller production was once again brilliantly overseen by Jimmy Miller, as he had from his first Stones production,
the raw cutting edge that had made the 1968 "Beggars's Banquet" such a milestone, also flourished here in 1971.  Mick Taylor's
  contribution to "Let It Bleed" was immense, but now two years down the road he had matured into one of the 1970's outstanding
  blues guitarists. The true stereo mix in combination of such a powerful impact, immediately informs I'm hearing a first pressing,
  the guitar riff intro is panned right only, leaving the left speaker dormant waiting for a signal,until Taylor's guitar & Charlie
  Watt's drums erupt.  On those poor pressings, Mint or not, that left speaker is full of explosive crackles & noise but not here,
  the intro plays through absolutely perfectly. "Brown Sugar" could not have better shown the Stones return to releasing records
after nearly 2 years, they returned as a full tilt rock and roll band, a great deal had happened to music since 1969. Taking the
singles charts by storm, hitting the No.1 spot in the USA but in the UK it stuck at No.2, imagine "Brown Sugar" being held off by
a syrupy, middle of the road, "Knock Three Times" by Dawn.  If ever a decade needed the Stones to come out with all guns blazing
  it was the early 1970's!  I am slipping into spending too long on one track so I will just add there is no surface sound and the sound
  quality here is just  staggering!  Ending in near silent linking grooves, no crackles or clicks, faint static only before "Sway",
Keith and Mick Taylor's guitars now take centre stage, brass was only used sparingly on the LP, this features an inspired blues
  solo from the maturing Mick Taylor. Exactly like the late 60's Stones recording's, Nicky Hopkins was there at the sessions, Nicky
  plays an outstanding piano behind an incredible Mick Jagger vocal, the sound  quality is just awesome, I have waited patiently to
  find another perfect first pressing, four long years since my last offering, the genuine joys of hearing that now is why I never
compromise my principals and list vastly inferior pressings.  I must not imply this is not vinyl, but my pleasure hearing a loved
album is motivation enough, even though I really checked this record out before, I still concentrate very hard, no sound flaws at
  all, faint natural static only.  My volume is as loud as ever, even if this record has such massive volume mastered as intimated,
when reading Jimmy Miller's first technical specifications, then very funny comments on the insert. This is a fantastic pressing,
  without any distortion, I prefer to say 'playing precisely as pressed'.... incredibly!   When the Stones played like this, the new
music trends like 'underground / progressive,' meant nothing, they give a solid and whole hearted performance of this superb
  Jagger & Richards composition.  The sheer impact of the music is essentially heard from original pressings, ending into a totally
  silent gap, yes, silent, no wonder I set such a high standard for "Sticky Fingers", that is so vital for the next song, "Wild Horses,"
because the intro is an acoustic  guitar, the notes ring out in perfectly sharp and clean sound. By 'clean sound' I am describing
the lack of crackles or clicks, I must admit that is exceptional for this track but with a strong Gram Parsons conncection here,
I am fussy, but not beyond reason.   A slow tempo on a very gentle track, this is so exposed to any irritating wear induced sound
but the ultra sharp edged sound is that of a Mint, perfectly pressed record.  This is where you know you're hearing the stunning
first stereo mix, in a purely late 1960's total separation of the individual parts of the track. The left channel has an acoustic
  guitar in with the bass and part of the percussion, Charlie's main part of the drums are panned from the right channel with Mick
Taylor's electric guitar and vocals. That allows  the individual parts of the track to have perfect definition while giving their
  fullest impact, also very pleasant for the ears to absorb sounds from opposite directions!  That is how stereo was intended to be
  heard, certainly not with everything centralised, sounding like a lamer version of mono. Those individual parts are in staggering
definition, especially on the acoustic guitar and  Mick Jagger's superb vocals.  Their very good friend and another artist's music
I dearly love Gram Parsons, he recorded the most wonderful version of this in the previous year, 1970, very highly recommended
to check out.  Gram was rumoured to have played on this version and as a close friend of the band, that has never been verified.
Another silent gap runs smoothly into the most stunning audio clarity imaginable, for an extremely powerful guitar riff start for,
"Can't You Hear Me Knocking". A fantastic Rolling Stones track, the mega powerful sound is crystal clear, this is not only visually
  beautiful record, it really does deliver some amazing sounds, one to put on your deck, hike up the volume and relax knowing there
is nothing on the record to break a magical spell cast by this feast of Stones' true greats.  Billy Preston adds keyboard skills,
  playing an organ, inspiring Mick Taylor into producing scintillating blues guitar with the looseness of a jam but the tightness of
a band at the height of their powers. This instrumental section is almost another track, now the improvisations take over as they
  create awesome music!  With such remarkable crispness from every individual sound, heard particularly on the snares, used to a
  great effect during the lengthy, extended ending.  This a superb pressing and this will improve even further with a few plays,
even allowing for that this is performing like a played-in record! The last gap on this side is yet again completely silent, very
rarely found here, I couldn't handle how a typical ebay V.G. grading will sound when you reach "You Gotta Move," I reject even
mint copies when from the poor pressings, because they deteriorate into the worst noise of all time. To have this exposed intro
so perfectly clean & clear of even any static, is incredible, the lone acoustic slide blues guitar only has occasional chords from
the second acoustic guitar. So wide open to the worst possible needle noise as anything on the LP, similar to "No Expectations"
on the 1968 "Beggar's Banquet" album.  This intro is astoundingly clean and clear of the expected crackles and clicks or even any
surface sound and it demonstrates how it's possible to follow the previous heavy rock track, into sheer perfection for acoustic
blues. The acute sharpness of those guitars is just staggeing, playing any record for the first  time in 45 years often brings
disappointment, but not this time.  Stunning audio perfection on the whole of this blues track without any drums,  there is no
hiding place for any crackles and clicks and there are none anyway.  Mick Jagger's vocals on the album were superb throughout
but on "You Gotta Move," he's in a class of his own as a blues vocalist. This style of acoustic blues music certainly brought out
the very best from him, acting in films was just a diversion. This is the authentic,'down on the floor' blues that first inspired
  the very young Stones in the early 1960's, here they are now the masters of this art form and in turn inspiring other musicians.
Side 2 keeps up the audio standards by having exceptionally near silent / silent run-in grooves,such minor static only should not
  be included but I am making certain nothing is missed.  An amazingly clean start to Side 2 is a major rarity and a welcome one!
A very powerful and ultra clean intro erupts into the really biting, hard kicking, rock of "Bitch."   The Rolling Stones firing on
all cylinders with Jimmy Miller's production bringing in brass to really punch home the track's forceful main riff, Mick Taylor
and Keith Richard were a perfect pairing and complimented each other, their two contrasting guitar styles make for a wonderful
sound. These lyrics may not be quite be in line with today's respect for women, but this was the 1970's and Mick Jagger's singing
out the lyrics in that unique fashion of his, this track really does kick hard!  The sound here is overpoweringly loud, but there is
none of the distortion common to the worn out originals. You can indeed yank up the volume as advised to on the insert by Jimmy
  Miller, and still find the same maximum clarity. Now into a very quiet intro to the superb soulful, r&b ballad "I Got The Blues,"
  a totally silent gap and during the completely exposed intro, there is no form of surface sound, the clarity is remarkable, the
method I use to fully describe every track gives the correct balance found on just about every record ever pressed, yes, there
will be a few moments when vinyl reveals it's vulnerabilities, but they pale into insignificance when the overwhelming majority of
of the album blows you clean away.  Exactly what an honestly sound graded record should present to buyers, those two individual
guitarists playing the intro are panned into the opposite speakers, Mick's incredible vocals are in both of the channels and Keith's
  vocal harmonies on the chorus are panned from the right speaker.  A short organ solo is stunning and the brass on  this track is in a
purely 1960's Stax or Memphis style, Mick's vocals are outstanding yet again. Now for the most exposed track on "Sticky Fingers",
  the magnificent "Sister Morphine," again starts from a silent running gap and with only a single acoustic guitar intro, I should be
describing loud surface sound if not crackles. I'm delighted to say the intro is up there with the cleanest I have ever heard, it
would be foolish to expect this to start like a CD, the merest hint of static always was, and always will be part of a vinyl love
affair. With such fantastic clarity there is virtually nothing in the background, certainly nothing in the foreground.  It simply
doesn't get any cleaner than this from a 1971 record, there are several sections that leave near silence between the verses, even
here there is still not the slightest hint of surface  sound. A truly awesome playing "Sister Morphine," without doubt one of the
Stones' greatest ever songs and performances, heard in the most incredible sound quality, I may be over fussy about how I hear
"Sister Morphine," it does get ruined by excessive noise and I refuse to accept anything but audio perfection and this record is
my find of 2016 so far, mind you, the other records I bought with with this look just as mouth watering!  Just staggering sound
quality for "Sister Morphine", there was very little changed from the 1968 unreleased version,the lyrics are almost identical but
Mick's very intensive vocals here are far superior to those on the "Beggars Banquet" session out-take.  Should anyone reading
this description and yet to hear the track, please see the lyrics, they contain the sheer intensity to the song.  The stereo mix
is a major part of this track's impact, Mick Taylor's slide blues guitar is panned from the right, Keith's acoustic guitar from
the left channel, before the final verse, Keith occupies both speakers and his acoustic guitar plays a really key role on this
remarkable track.  The fade-out is ending is ultra clear, the gap is completely silent before the perfectly clean and clear intro
to the brilliant "Dead Flowers", what superb songs on this album!   A very nicely country flavoured song and another Gram Parsons
influence on an outstanding melody with such an infectious chorus, Gram's influence had been very strong on the Stones and in
  particular, on Mick and Keith's songwriting, this first stereo mix is a real joy to hear with such fantastic clarity, even though
not exactly a heavy rock performance, there is no surface sound at all on one second of the track, even including the last notes
fading away naturally into a silent gap.   It's almost a shame to have arrived at the last track, but it is now the time for one
of "Sticky Finger's" most outstanding songs, "Moonlight Mile".  The gap is ultra smooth, amazingly another single acoustic guitar
only intro from the right channel, is superbly clear of any pressing or surface sound.  This deeply beautiful melody has strings
to add very dramatic effects and Mick Jagger smoulders away with such an incredible vocal, I think this has to be one of the most
overlooked and underestimated Stones tracks from any era. The sound quality is just stunning, right from the immaculately clean
intro, through the whole of this beautiful melody, this is the finest sounding "Moonlight Mile" of all time.  Few originals play
without irritating massive crackles, that all but drown out such a beautiful acoustic guitar fuelled melody, this album has been
a genuine pleasure to have around today even If I did offer it without hearing the record, "Sticky Fingers" was the springboard
for the Stones to launch their own label with, that is academic now, in 2016 this can now be looked back on as one of, if not their
all time greatest album.
{Roy}

   

R & M RECORDS.
My lifetime's love of music and records began at a very young age, the arrival of the Beatles and the 1960's decade
  in general had a very profound effect. It was only natural to bring all my first hand experience of collecting vinyl
  into becoming a professional record seller.  Nearly thirty years ago we entered into the wonderful atmosphere
of record fairs with the highest possible standards set. When the Internet became the world's new market place for
  vinyl, in 2001 it was time to join ebay. Those standards were rigidly adhered to as they will always continue to be,
the basics of honesty and integrity were very much part of the era the music I love originated in, so here is our friendly
and very efficient service we are proud to provide;
EVERY RECORD IS FULLY PLAYED AND COMES WITH A 'NO ARGUMENT' MONEY BACK GUARANTEE.
  I USE GOOD OLD COMMON SENSE AS WELL AS A GLOBALLY ACCEPTED GRADING TERMINOLOGY
  FROM THE U.K. "RECORD COLLECTOR PRICE GUIDE" BOOK.
THERE IT CLEARLY STATES "Sound Quality" AFFECTS EVERY GRADING LEVEL AND THAT IS THE ONE
AND ONLY POSSIBLE WAY TO ACCURATELY GRADE RECORDS. i.e. COMBINING A STRICT VISUAL
INSPECTION WITH VERY CLOSELY LISTENING TO EVERY SECOND, UNLESS PERHAPS IN THE CASE
OF GENUINELY UNPLAYED VINYL.  EVEN THEN WE STILL TAKE FULL RESPONSIBILITY FOR A RECORD
WHEN A CUSTOMER RECEIVES EITHER A SEALED OR AN UNPLAYED RECORD.
 
  We take 100% responsibility after an item has been posted and offer our fullest support in the event of any problems.

"There Are No Problems, Only Solutions" (John Lennon)

MY DESCRIPTIONS WILL ALWAYS BE 100% HONEST AND TOTALLY ACCURATE ON ALL GRADINGS
FROM 'V.G.' ( VERY GOOD), TO THE ULTIMATE 'MINT' CONDITION.
ANY QUESTIONS ON OUR ITEMS ARE WELCOMED AND WILL BE PROMPTLY REPLIED TO.
 
WE ARE FULLY EXPERIENCED AT SHIPPING WORLDWIDE AND NO EFFORT IS SPARED TO PROTECT
RECORDS AND COVERS ETC.  WE WELCOME BIDDERS FROM ANY COUNTRY IN THE WORLD.
ALL RECORDS ARE REMOVED FROM THEIR SLEEVES AND PLACED INTO NEW PROTECTIVE CARD
SLEEVES AND THEN PLACED INTO NEW, HEAVYWEIGHT PLASTIC OUTER SLEEVES.
THE GREATEST ATTENTION IS PAID TO MAKING THE PACKAGING EXTREMELY STRONG & SECURE.
EVERY POSSIBLE EFFORT IS MADE TO ENSURE A SAFE DELIVERY AND WE ONLY USE THE VERY BEST
QUALITY PACKAGING MATERIALS, THE COST OF THE ITEM IS IMMATERIAL, EVERY RECORD IS
TREATED EXACTLY THE SAME.
WE DO NOT TREAT POSTAGE AS A MONEY MAKING PROJECT, POSTAGE IS LESS THAN COST, USING
ONLY PROFESSIONALLY PACKED BOXES WITH SUBSTANTIAL PROTECTIVE PACKAGING THAT DOES
WEIGH A LITTLE EXTRA.
UNDER PAYPAL & EBAY'S GUIDELINES, ALL RECORDS WILL BE SENT VIA A FULLY INSURED TRACKABLE
SERVICE.
We have kept all our charges at the same level for years now, but due to the Post Office's new price increases, regretfully we
will have to increase the cost of LP's, however, singles will remain unchanged.  Ebay were aware of that happening and have
  increased their minimum postal cost for LP's to £7.00, that figure has been enforced by the UK Post Office and it will become
our UK First Class, Recorded Delivery cost for albums up to the value of £46.  A temporary reduction this week means we can
now post LP's for £5, but who knows how long before the Post Office return to £7?
For LP's valued above £46, the cost will be £9, we are unhappy about either increase but our high standard of packaging has meant
in 13 years of ebay trading, there has not been one record damaged, we are determined to maintain that in the present and future.
IN THE UK RECORDS UP TO THE VALUE OF £46 WILL BE SENT RECORDED DELIVERY, OVER £46 WILL BE
SENT SPECIAL DELIVERY.
  FOR THE REST OF THE WORLD ALL RECORDS WILL BE SENT VIA 'INTERNATIONAL SIGNED FOR.'

POSTAGE  COST FOR LP's
UK: UP TO VALUE OF £46, FIRST CLASS RECORDED DELIVERY  £5.00
UK: OVER VALUE OF £46, FULLY INSURED SPECIAL DELIVERY £9.00
EUROPE: FULLY INSURED VIA INTERNATIONAL SIGNED FOR  £15.00
USA,JAPAN & REST OF THE WORLD FULLY INSURED VIA INTERNATIONAL SIGNED FOR £20.00
POSTAGE COST FOR EP's & 7"
UK: UP TO THE VALUE OF £46 FIRST CLASS RECORDED DELIVERY £3.00
UK: OVER THE VALUE OF £46 FULLY INSURED SPECIAL DELIVERY £6.00
EUROPE: AIR MAIL VIA INTERNATIONAL SIGNED FOR £10.00
USA, JAPAN ETC. AIRMAIL VIA INTERNATIONAL SIGNED FOR £12.00


PAYMENT DETAILS.
WE WILL SEND ALL WINNING BIDDERS AN INVOICE WITH THE FULL PAYMENT AND POSTAL DETAILS,
AS NEAR TO THE AUCTION ENDING AS POSSIBLE.
OUR AIM IS TO MAKE YOUR PURCHASE SMOOTH AND TROUBLE FREE.
FOR UK BUYERS;
WE ACCEPT:  PAYPAL, CHEQUES, POSTAL ORDERS & BANK WIRES.
FOR OVERSEAS BUYERS;
WE ACCEPT:  PAYPAL, INTERNATIONAL MONEY ORDERS IN POUNDS STERLING ONLY.
OR BANK TO BANK WIRE TRANSFERS.
WE WILL NOT MAKE FALSE STATEMENTS ON CUSTOMS DECLARATION FORMS AND WILL ALWAYS
CONDUCT ALL OF OUR BUSINESS WITH TOTAL HONESTY.
AS MUCH AS WE SYMPATHISE WITH THE WAY SOME COUNTRIES CHARGE SUCH HEAVY IMPORT
DUTIES, WE WILL NOT LIE.

  Pay me with PayPal.
I don't charge my buyers extra!