how to price your vinyl records collection - rare vinyl collector item


« Back to Main Page

BEATLES Yellow Submarine LP UK VERY 1st PRESS JAN 1969 RARE MONO, 1 PLAY, MINT

BEATLES Yellow Submarine LP UK VERY 1st PRESS JAN 1969 RARE MONO 1 PLAY MINT
[CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE]
Auction Details:
Code ID
#12566
Ebay Item #
252318204688
Sold Price
$1137.20
Bids
16
Auction End date
19 Mar 2016
Seller Location
Chelmsford, Essex

Item Description

"To your mother......"
It's all to much,
It's all to much.
When I look into your eyes, your love is there for me,
And the more I go inside, the more there is to see.
It's all too much for me to take,
The love that's shining all around you,
Everywhere, it's what you make,
For us to take, it's all too much.
Floating down the stream of time, of life to life with me,
Makes no difference where you are, or where you'd like to be.
It's all too much for me to take,
The love that's shining all around here,
All the world is birthday cake,
So take a piece, but not too much.
Sail me on a silver sun, for I know that I'm free,
Show me that I'm everywhere, and get me home for tea.
It's all to much for me to see,
A love that's shining all around here,
The more I am, the less I know,
And what I do is all too much.
It's all too much for me to take,
The love that's shining all around you,
Everywhere, it's what you make,
For us to take, it's all too much.
It's too much.....It's too much.
With your long blonde hair and your eyes of blue,
With your long blonde hair and your eyes of blue,
You're too much........ Too much, too much, too much......................

 

 
THE BEATLES: "Yellow Submarine" LP.  RARE VERY FIRST UK PRESSING, 17th JANUARY 1969, IN MONO.
I have included many of the unique features of the Mono first pressings in the main page headings, but like all Beatles first
editions, there are still multiple other items to detail, I will try to make sure I cover every one.   The equally important info
in the item page heading, is the fact this is an absolutely stunning, once only played, Mint first pressing record.  A 1960's
pressing, but this time the UK only, Mono "Yellow Submarine"  version is the rarest of all the Beatles albums, the final Mono
version of a Beatles album with a 'PMC' suffix, was made in numbers so low, they equate with a Limited Edition.
  APPLE LABEL: PMC 7070.
   
AS THE VERY FIRST PRESSING, THE  DARK GREEN  LABELS HAVE THE "Sold In UK" TEXT.
The combination of the original dark green label on Side 1 and "Sold In UK"  are exclusive features to the UK first pressings.
 
  LIKE THE LENNON / McCARTNEY SONGS, BOTH GEORGE HARRISON COMPOSITIONS,"Only A Northern Song" & "It's All Too Much"
  WERE CREDITED TO; "Northern Songs Ltd. NCB "
As early as 1967, George was unhappy with how he, John & Paul were being ripped off by 'Northern Songs' who paid them a pittance,
  based on a contract Brian Epstein very naively agreed to in March 1963.  The Beatles were even more naive for signing such a one
  sided contract, George was more astute than he is ever given credit for, during the "Sgt. Pepper" recording sessions he wrote the
  scathing "Only A Northern Song."  He and Ringo had signed until the end of 1968, they refused to re-sign, instead George formed
  his own company to publish his compositions within the Beatles and for solo projects on their new Apple label, 'Harrisongs.'
  Both tracks were written and recorded in 1967, so George's contract with 'Northern Songs' held firm, if my belief is correct and
  these very first pressings were made in late 1968, it would have been too early anyway for 'Harrisongs' to dispute ownership.
 
  Regarding the pressing date of the "Yellow Submarine" album, the labels and the cover have the publication date as '1969' and
  that has to accurately place the printing and vinyl pressing in the first two weeks of January.  The actual editing and mastering
  was completed on the 25th November,1968, but there was still no urgency to release "Yellow Submarine" before the traditional
  Christmas period when record sales were at their peak.  There was actually more time available then in the actual January,1969
  issue, a very tight schedule to start in the New Year with only just over two weeks before distribution to record shops, which
  accounts for not having time to correct the most basic error any printing firm can make, omitting their own credit on the cover!
  I will be returning to the 25th November later in the description, it was the day this mono mix was made in Abbey Road Studios
  and as important and unique that is, the mono mix itself has discussion points I will not ignore.
  MAITRIX:  XEX 715 - 1 / XEX 716 - 1
EMI STAMPING CODES;
  SIDE 1: M 1
SIDE 2: M 1
The above showing both sides were sourced from the first 'mono mothers', confirms this is the very rare very first pressing made
  in those first two weeks of January,1969.  (No.3 for Sides 1 & 2, from the first mothers per individual metal stamping plates.)
ORIGINAL 1968 BLACK APPLE 12" INNER SLEEVE, UNLIKE THE COUNTERFEIT/FAKES BEING SOLD ON EBAY, THIS
  IS AUTHENTIC.  MATT AND TEXTURED  WITH A DIE-CUT CENTRE HOLE, ONLY ON THE SIDE WITH A SHAPED RECORD
  ACCESS ON THE TOP OPENING.  EXTREMELY VULNERABLE TO WEAR EVEN WHEN THE RECORD WAS UNTOUCHED FOR
  THE LAST 47 YEARS, MOST WERE SPLIT ON THE CONTACT POSITIONS ON THE SIDES AND THE BOTTOM EDGE CENTRAL
  POSITION'S.  SO POORLY DESIGNED, THEY WERE ONLY IN USE FOR ONE YEAR, MINT SIMPLY DOES NOT EXIST AND
  BE WARY ABOUT THE COUNTERFEIT APPLE SLEEVES MADE IN 2016.  THERE HAS TO BE SOME RUBBING AND SIGNS
  OF BEING MADE IN 1968 OR THEY ARE FAKE.   ONLY USED ONCE, THIS AVOIDED THE HANDLING, THIS IS UNSPLIT
  WITH ABSOLUTE MINIMAL RUBBING, THE DIE-CUT HOLE HAS SOME RUBBING AND RUFFLES FROM THE RECORD'S
CONTACT< BUT NO RIPS OR TEARS.  A SURPRISINGLY  A NATURAL GENTLE IMPRESSION FROM THE HEAVYWEIGHT
   RECORD WITH A FEW RELATED LIGHT CREASES, IN EXCELLENT+++ CONDITION.
VERY FIRST EDITION LAMINATED FRONT, MONO "Yellow Submarine" COVER.
  OFTEN QUOTED AS BEING DEFINITIVE TO THE FIRST ISSUE COVERS, THE PRESENCE OF FLIPBACK EDGES AND THE
  SLEEVE NOTES ON THE BACK DIVIDED BY RED LINES, WERE ALSO RE-ISSUED LATER IN 1969.  ONLY THE GENUINE
  FIRST PRESSINGS HAVE A UNIQUE FEATURE;
  "Garrod & Lofthouse' made the just mentioned mistake of omitting their own printing credit in the usual position, bottom right
  on the horizontal bottom flipback edge.  It was left blank, further omitting the Mono and Stereo catalogue numbers and a likely
  encoded printing date.  A similar scenario to the 1967 first pressing of of Pink Floyd's "The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn,"  I am
certain 'Garrod' would have realised the error, but economics and the time factor once again dictated they had to be sold.
The front cover has a great deal of white as background to the brilliant artwork, the colour always had a creamy tone and all the
re-issues that followed in the 1970's and onwards, had that lightened to a pure white.  The same was true for the "White Album",
which was the contemporary album and of course still sitting at No.1 in January 1969, so the first editions are usually severely
  stained and far, far worse.  A look round ebay will soon establish the terrible state of mono and stereo first issue covers, this
beautiful cover was hardly used in January,1969,then never returned to and perfectly stored for the next 47 years.  This only
has the slightest possible ageing and still very close to the 1969 white colour, a common problem was such pronounced creases,
they caused laminate splits on the main body of the front, as well as the edges, corners and the spine.  Once that happened the
exposure to the atmosphere invited the terrible discolouration and stains, the once wonderful colours on the artwork faded and
also turned various shades of yellow and brown. I do readily accept the rarity of the Mono cover and allowances might have to
  be made, but as a UK Beatles first issue, my highest standard still applies until I can produce finest possible conditions of all
all three original items.  In other words, they have to reach the same demands I made for my own first pressing of the mono and
  stereo versions of "Yellow Submarine", this cover most certainly does!  The richness of the vibrancy of the artwork's colours is
  dazzingly bright and unfaded, in fact, to spare reading a string of superlatives, my revealing pictures say it all.
 
  The lamination  on the front is extremely glossy and there is no wear or blemishes to describe anywhere on the cover, anything
  here is related to how a heavyweight record's circular shape impression naturally forms over the decades.   There are the usual
tiny laminate lines next to the spine and edges, the impression on the top half and bottom corresponding to the record's internal
position, comparatively gentle, positively present, how could it not be with the heavy record inside for nearly half a century?
A really beautiful  looking front cover, I can and do regularly produce Mint records but I cannot prevent gravity, all the edges,
   including crisp unruffled opening sides are in near perfect condition and 'near' allows for standing.  The bottom right corner
has the usual light standing pressure, but both right side corners are square shaped and do not have the common rounded wear,
even the spine tips or left side corners only have the slightest possible rubbing, the corners up as a whole are exceptional for
a very first  mono or stereo cover.
  The spine has the uniquely shaped top and bottom endings pinched to a point, unworn, unscuffed laminate means superbly clear
and unworn lettering for the central title.  Relating to holding the record for 47 years and gravity, just a few ripples that acted
  as pressure or stress relieve like  tiny laminate edge lines.  I must have written that literally thousands of times in fifteen
years of ebay descriptions, they appeared on covers holding unplayed records, which Side 2 of this record actually is!
  The matt untreated back panel is in superbly clean and unscuffed condition, like most of these first editions the untreated open
grain top surface had flecks in the paper, they cannot be included in grading because that was how the covers were made.   Once
again, the colour Beatles cartoon figures and the 'yellow submarine' still have the bright and vividly deep colour tones of 1969.
The near pure white background to those and the extensive text only has the very mildest ageing possible for this highly absorbent
top surface paper.   The flipback edges are in very sound and strong condition and the two red lines separating the Derek Taylor
promo text about the "White Album" is the original deep red colour. Exactly like the rare first made only, 1968 Corgi models of
'Yellow Submarine', they had a red line as a border to separate the white and yellow sections, that line would not be included
on eve immediately following models.  Due to how difficult that was to hand paint and how long it took, the cover used the same
red lines to divide the text, like in the film, the cover's pictured 'yellow submarine' top centre has that same red lines.
WITHOUT ANY WEAR OR SCUFFS AND ONLY MODERATE STANDING IN STORAGE TRAITS, THE GRADING HAS TO
REFLECT SUCH LOVING CARE LAVISHED ON THE COVER IN 1969 AND EVER SINCE, A RIDICULOUSLY OVER HARSH
GRADING IS EXCELLENT+++ / NEAR MINT CONDITION.
THE LABELS ARE IMMACULATE, WITHOUT ANY SPINDLE ALIGNMENT TRACES ON SIDE 1's GREEN LABEL, SO THE
  FILM SCORE MUSIC HAD NO INTEREST FOR THE ONE ORIGINAL OWNER, THAT SIDE WAS LEFT UNPLAYED.
SIDE 2's LABEL CENTRE ONLY SHOWS ONE PLAY, DEFINED BY ONLY BEING THE ONE SPINDLE ALIGNMENT TRACE.
THE VINYL HAS THAT 'JUST PRESSED' ULTRA GLOSSY SURFACE AND ANY HANDLING OR PLAYING TRACES ARE
  FEATHER LIGHT AND NEAR INVISIBLE.  WITH ONE SIDE UNPLAYED, THE GRADING IS MINT CONDITION.

SIDE 1
"Yellow Submarine"
"Only A Northern Song" (George Harrison)
"All Together Now"
"Hey Bulldog"  
"It's All Too Much" (George Harrison)
"All You Need Is Love"
SIDE 2
"Pepperland"
"Sea Of Time"  
"Sea Of Holes"
"Sea Of Monsters"  
"March Of The Meanies"  
"Pepperland Laid Waste"
"Yellow Submarine In Pepperland" (John Lennon / Paul McCartney, arranged by George Martin)
Side 1:
  All Songs Written By John Lennon / Paul McCartney Except Where Credited to George Harrison.
The Beatles Tracks Were Recorded 12th  May,1967 - 11th February,1968.
 
Side 2:
  All Songs Written By George Martin, Except Where Credited.
George Martin's Tracks Were Recorded 22nd & 23rd October,1968.
  All Tracks Produced By George Martin.

 

The Beatles UK original 1960's albums normally sold in phenomenal quantities, but there was the one exception,"Yellow Submarine".
  If you examine the month of issue, the time scale had moved on since the "Yellow Submarine" film's premiere in July 1968 to such an,
   extent, in January,1969 the Beatles were recording, or more like trying to record, during the filming of "Get Back" / "Let It Be."
  The psychedelia of 1967 - 1968 had receded and a stark reality had settled over 1969, low sales of the "Yellow Submarine" album
  was brought about by several reasons,a major factor at the time was having to accept only one side of the album contained Beatles
  recordings, but Side 1 offered four new songs that were previously unheard and unique to both the album and the film.   An album
  issued in mono and stereo, the mono version is a subject I will discuss soon, releasing a 1968 soundtrack in 1969 was very poor
  timing by EMI and APPle, although EMI were the ruling body not Apple.  The film was premiered in July 1968 in the UK, that placed
the soundtrack's release in the seventh month after the event, when a simultaneous issue in July '68 would have attracted so much
  more attention.   The LP's release was planned for 1968 but held back due to the imminent "White Album," the order of events as it
  was supposed to happen is seen on the UK back cover liner notes, they were written by Derek Taylor to promote the "White Album".
  As an expensive double album and still selling really well in early '69, the January release of "Yellow Submarine" had restricted
  sales.  "Yellow Submarine" struggled to No.4 in the UK charts, spending a mere 10 weeks in the charts, which for any other artist
  were more than reasonable figures, but not for a new Beatles album, previously advance sales alone had the latest Beatles LP's
  found then hitting No.1 immediately and then remaining as currently charting for record breaking periods.  Undeterred, EMI next
  tried another release on the 14th April,1969, but that was even worse commercially, "Yellow Submarine" only managed one week in
  the charts, stalling at No.14.   One more attempt in September 1969 was met with partial success, a No. 4 position and a nine week
  residency in the UK charts.    By that September issue, not only was the mono format dropped completely, the stereo version fell
  outside EMI's use of the "Sold In UK" text on the labels.   I do not accept the commonly believed view, that mono was obsolete by
  1969, but all this still adds up to the reason for a major rarity attached to the mono "Yellow Submarine" LP, although I consider
  stereo first issue equally rare as well due to poor sales. I am only discussing top condition first issues in either format, what
use is a deeply scratched and worn out record in a battered, stained and abused cover?  Mono had yet to be made extinct but the
future was fast heading towards a stereo only format, EMI were ahead of most of the other UK major record companies as the 60's
decade drew to a close, the reversal of recent times is there to see on the back cover of "Yellow Submarine."   Now for the first
and only time on a Beatles LP cover, EMI were printing playing equipment instructions for mono records, the exact opposite of the
stereo information that started right from the Beatles 1963 debut "Please Please Me," now the reverse had happened in 1969 and
  I have always been surprised this has never written about before or even noticed.  The text on the bottom centre of the cover was
a real turning point for the  mono format that been instated since vinyl was first manufactured, it became exclusive to just one
  Beatles cover.   I challenge anyone questioning the validity of the mono "Yellow Submarine" to absorb that and realise this was
the most important Beatles album of them all historically. It was also the final Beatles latest album released in mono and stereo
where only months earlier, the "White Album" cover was printed with mono and stereo catalogue numbers and really all the covers
were mono orientated, 'Stereo' was printed on the back top corner as an after thought.  Significantly on top of the lamination it
was not part of the original printing.  EMI had in effect sealed the fate of the next Beatles album format, the following October
saw "Abbey Road" becoming the first (and last studio album) remixed and released in Stereo only, nobody knew it at the time,but
the "White Album" was the final Beatles album with a custom made  mono mix, to the extent it contained totally different versions.
Leading me directly into a tricky subject to discuss but one I am qualified to deal with, before I do, I must remember to confirm
this record's stamping codes alone establish the mono "Yellow Submarine" on offer is ultra rare for the condition and from the
very first pressings made, EMI's Stamping codes 'GD 1 / L 1' are exceptionally  low.  The merits of the mono version are rarely
discussed by sellers in terms of the mix or the actual impact of the music, as the rarest British first pressing Beatles album it
  has only been viewed for the financial value.

"Mono Or Mono?...... Mono!"

 

This section will only interest those into the actual 'sound' of the Beatles music, to most record buyers & sellers ebay is ideal
  for transactions, but many business and private sellers announce they never play the records and will only visually grade them.
  Which is in direct contradiction of the definitions of the universally accepted 'Record Collector' grading terminology, unless in
  genuine Unplayed/Mint condition, every subsequent grading 100% concerns the sound reproduction, many sellers state they
  they do not own a record player, even though they have 'Record Collector' grading definition's on display on their item pages.
  I care passionately about the sound of all the records I sell, deprived of the face to face contact I enjoyed so much at record
fairs, in 2001 I found ebay cold and rigidly indifferent, I decided to try and make as much of a personal input as possible and
here I am ten years later.  When records like this need an up close examination that directly involves original Master Tapes, I
  I can call on a lifetime's experience on that very subject, personal opinions do matter but only when backed up by solid facts.
 
  I am certain I am the first & only record seller on ebay raising the above question, or is even prepared to discuss something of
a purely 'sound' nature, I cannot ignore what my ears have told me ever since first hearing the mono version of the album in '69.
In fairness, that is perhaps the difference between my generation who mostly heard mono records throughout the whole 60's decade,
and anyone retrospectively hearing mono after being accustomed to stereo only.  The "Yellow Submarine" mono LP became the final
Beatles album issued in Mono until 1994, when "Live At The BBC" was finally released, when compared to the staggering sounding
mono Beatles albums from "Please Please Me" to the "White Album," the mono "Yellow Submarine" did not quite hit the extraordinary
  level of all that preceded it on albums, singles & EP's. By 1970 I was hearing every Beatles album in stereo for the first time,
  including the "Abbey Road" LP, the stereo "Yellow Submarine" album had 'the sound', but that was slightly confusing at the time
  because of vast differences between mono and stereo.  Not just sound adjustments, if you grew up in the 1960's you experienced
  making the transition from black & white television to colour, previously colour only existed in cinemas and main features where
  shown after the black & white 'B-movies', in 1968 I watched the "Yellow Submarine" film......in colour.  A decade that saw the
  first launch of a satellite, by 1969, Man was walking on the moon!
 
  In 1988 Abbey Road Studios and the Beatles Master Tapes were thrown open to author Mark Lewisohn, he was given access to EMI's
meticulously indexed Beatles recording sessions and full mixing and mastering details. We had bootlegs of most of those sessions
which included the many takes, out-takes and unreleased songs, but now Mark Lewisohn revealed all the precise dates and material
on the Master Tapes nobody had heard of before.  Like all fellow determined collector's, I studied Mark Lewisohn's fantastic feat
of documentation in his first 1988 book, that concentrated almost entirely on EMI's Master Tapes, including their Tape Spool box
lids with handwritten notations made by George Martin at the time.  Also EMI's session logs, which were meticulous to even actual
times recording's took place, Lewisohn revealed if John Lennon wanted to take home a cassette copy of just made recordings or an
acetate of a song, even Lennon had to sign EMI's log book or be refused.  "The Complete Beatles Recording Sessions" was and still
is the most definitive book ever written about the Beatles and the entry concerning the mono mix of "Yellow Submarine" partially
  hinted at what my ears had been telling me since January,1969.  As I am selling a first Mono pressing, in theory I should only be
presenting the UK mix, not delving into it, don't misunderstand me, I love the mono and stereo versions equally and would never
part with own treasured Mono first pressing, but the actual sound of the Beatles music is much too important to me not to ever be
openly honest. Regardless of having paid a really high price to the one original owner for such fantastic condition, I will still
discuss issues other sellers shun or just have no interest in.  In 1968 Mark Lewisohn was fulfilling a dream scenario, there were
  top quality Beatles out-takes appearing on the earliest bootleg Beatles CD's, but not precise recording dates, facts and figures,
  back then there was only a small number of fanatics who collected unreleased material.  I bought the first ever Beatles bootleg
vinyl in the early 70's,"Kum Back", I went the usual route of cassette tapes which were wonderful for building a comprehensive
collection by swapping with other enthusiast's. Mark Lewisohn is often accused of feeding the material to the next stage, bootleg
CD's that appeared with such astounding first generation Master Tape sound, the official CD albums sounded vastly inferior!  The
incredible sound quality was nothing to do with Lewisohn, the newly released material centred around John Barrett, one of EMI's
top sound engineers who was given the job of listening to and compiling to release as a Beatles album in 1988. Cover artwork was
prepared and the tracks selected for a single album of studio out-takes/unreleased tracks, but the project was shelved until it
eventually emerged as "Anthology," in the most complete form collector's only dreamt about ever hearing officially, on vinyl, CD
and video's.  It was was 'all too much' when one of Barrett's compilations was smuggled out of Abbey Road Studios released on a
double CD, 'Vigitone 178 /179.'  Master Tape sound that set the standard EMI gravitated towards in the 1990's, the whole point of
this is to establish two facts, I am a professional record seller, but unlike others I am not just selling cardboard and plastic,
it was the music in the grooves of Beatles records that ignited my passion and that started in January,1963.  Ever since I have
fanatically bought and tracked down every official and unofficial recording the Beatles ever made, live and in recording studios.
Here is the relevant paragraph in Lewisohn's "The Complete Beatles Recording Sessions" book, referring to the UK release of the
"Yellow Submarine" album with the mixing and mastering details directly from EMI / Abbey Road Studios.

 

Page 164;
Fiday 17 January 1969: LP release: Yellow Submarine Apple [Parlophone] PMC 7070 (mono) / PCS 7070 (stereo)
A new album by the Beatles? Not Quite. Half by The Beatles, half "original film score, composed & orchestrated by George Martin,
produced by George Martin."  Side A was the Beatles, Side B the score.
Perhaps the most puzzling aspect of the LP was the time it had taken to see the light of day. "Yellow Submarine," albeit a highly
successful film in both critical and box-office terms, had been on release for all of seven months before this (supposedly)
accompanying soundtrack album was issued. The songs themselves were even older.
One reason for the delay was the November,1968 release of "The Beatles", which the group felt was of greater import and must take
precedence.  Another was that George Martin wanted to re-record his side of the album. (he had originally taped the film score at
Olympic Studios, with Kevin Grant and Chkiantz assisting.)  On 22 and 23 October 1968, personally conducting the 41-piece George
Martin Orchestra and sharing production duties with Ron Richards, he re-taped everything in two three-hour sessions in Studio 1,
  Abbey Road.  The engineer was Geoff Emerick, tape operator Nicki Webb.  Stereo re-mixing and editing was done on 24 & 25 October,
Martin producing, Emerick and Mike Sheady assisting.   The stereo album was cut at Abbey Road by Harry Moss on 22 November,
the mono (simply a monaurial cut of the stereo) was done on 25 November.

 

There you have it, 'simply a monaural cut of the stereo' means in record mixing terms, the multi-track that contained all the
individual instruments and vocals, was used for the stereo mix only.  For the mono mix, the stereo mix was 'folded down' to mono
  where previously a Beatles mono mix was made from the the multi-track mixing console.  I realise this might be getting much too
  technical by now, but to write honestly I have to give all the information I am in possession of, quoting from Lewisohn's book
  places the facts before anyone interested in events 47 years ago, in late 1968.  You could argue a stereo mix was made directly
  from the finished tapes by Harry Moss, and the mono mix originating from that was therefore professionally made by EMI's top
  sound engineers.  What is also also true, regardless of the tide now gradually turning against mono, this was the only mono mix
  and there are the four unique previously unheard Beatles songs that were were prepared and mastered in Abbey Road Studios.
  An original 1960's analogue mono mix is the issue here, but I felt I had to include even the slightest deviation and my ears have
  always been that highly tuned. For fanatics like myself who were into collecting Beatles studio out-takes on bootlegs, right from
  the 1970's through to the CD bootleg era of the late 80's and onward, we had to tell faked 'out-takes' from the genuine ones.
  There were as many fake Beatles bootlegs than authentic ones, the stereo 60's records were so perfectly separated, crooks would
  and still do record one half of a track to compile whole albums claiming to be 'alternative versions.'  Only now they turn to the
  "Anthology" series,why I detest the counterfeit albums being openly sold on ebay, usually for ridiculously high prices, sellers
  profiting from them DO NOT not have the qualifications to tell if they really are alternative versions. Anyway, when an official
  Beatles LP release had a mono mix and all this took place in Abbey Road Studios, it has to be accepted today as the only one that
has an authentic sound. Digital re-mastering is just a disastrous exercise that destroys the original analogue sound, personally
  I cannot accept a 21st century version of psychedelic music designed for downloading in sound files, is ever going to get close
  to the real thing. I happily accept the circumstances surrounding the mixing and mastering in November '68, I dearly love my mono
  "Yellow Submarine"  album and all this section is my belief in only ever presenting records with a balanced overview.  For those
  who find all the technical stuff boring, no problem, I'm with you all the way and I just turn up the volume and let "Hey Bulldog"
  and the other tracks on the Beatles side blow me away!  An EMI 1968 mono fold-down' is still in another sound dimension to just
  about every record made in any decade and any country, now I can get on detailing the rarest UK mono Beatles LP.   The black and
  and gold "Please Please Me" LP is Not rarer, because more pressings by far were made on that label, even allowing for the volume
  lost over the decades, on ebay alone, at least 4 or 5 copies a week are listed on ebay, you could triple or quadruple that by the
  amount sold at record fairs and other internet sites.
 
  Now I can give an unbiased personal opinion, provided a first pressing record is unworn and undamaged, this mono LP version is a
  stunning way to hear the music, as just mentioned, "Hey Bulldog" is just awesome in mono!  Side 2 has the orchestral film score, as
  much as I have the very deepest respect for George Martin's ability to compose, orchestrate and produce it,  I am never going to
  pretend I have any interest in the non-Beatles involvement side of this album.  I must have seen the film more times than I could
  count, when my my kids were young they fell in love with the video I recorded from a Christmas TV broadcast in the 1980's, then
  the official video....with terrible sound!  Now I watch it with my young grand children who know every line spoken and sing along
to the lyrics to every song, the wonders of DVD's!   George Martin's score works brilliantly with the animation and I love it in that
  context, describing Side 2 is out of the question. I could have left hearing it due to Side 2 being unplayed, all Beatles records
  are fascinating and I am certain others will love both sides, I decided one play with my usual undetectable care, would allow me
  to now say how perfectly the entire second side performed.   A side synonymous with almighty crackles and explosive pops on the
  mono and stereo first pressings  in fact, all re-issues, mostly because the needle was dragged through tracks looking for some
  kind of Beatles interlude or even spoken words.  With that in mind, I am delighted to say the uniqueness of the mono version of
  George Martin's film score side was heard and enjoyed in absolutely perfect sound.  The Side opening run-in grooves are as silent
  as vinyl gets and the sheer clarity and power of the music in superb.....mono!  A Mint Side 2 means there is not a single crackle
  heard and there is also virtually no form of surface static or needle sound audible.  I actually do enjoy the second track as an
  audio listening experience, "The Sea Of Holes" opens to  psychedelic Indian music and the sitar had such amazing presence, great
  to hear that section so perfectly clean and lacking any hint of vinyl producing those lovely exotic sounds.   I was pleased I did
  listen to Side 2 because I can positively say that even the very quietest passages of music have the same razor sharp egded mono
  sound as Side 1.  Knowing how orchestral music lovers only want to hear absolute perfection, I whole heartedly recommend this
  record to them.  Individual instruments are in a fantastic  mono mix and the sound definition is precisely detailed from a flute
  to the full blown whole orchestra.   Side 1 places me on more comfortable home territory and I do not hesitate in saying the
  Beatles tracks are simply awesome and equally recommend the staggering sound on all six tracks. I will take the the opportunity
  to provide details about the four exclusive recordings, along with the other two songs.  I felt obliged to include how the mono
  mix was arrived at, having done so, I believe this final mono Beatles LP did indeed create an ultimate testimony to the Beatles,
  George Martin & EMI's mastering to vinyl of the format that graced every single the Beatles track ever recorded, pre- the stereo
  only "Abbey Road" & "Let It Be" LP's.  I must remember to say how sad it was hearing he died this week, he was more than just a
record producer for the Beatles, he was an honoury member in the studio.
I really enjoy writing unhurried descriptions for rare Beatles albums like this, so I think a little more pressing and printing
  info before moving onto Side 1.  The labels are the same 1968 dark green colour tone found on the then current "White Album."
  Containing for the final time on the latest Beatles album since 1964, the "Sold In UK" text,  most importantly, the 'PMC 7070'
  catalogue number for a Parlophone / Apple mono record, with an 'XEX' maitrix prefix, not stereo's 'YEX' prefix.  The labels are
  in superb condtion, unblemished in any way, with a faint spindle use traces showing only one play, amazingly low for a 47 year
old Beatles very first pressing. The vinyl has a beautiful deep glossy sheen without any scratches, marks or scuffs on the entire
record, any near invisible surface handling is near invisible if not invisible.  Grading it Mint is certainly visually correct and the
audio has massive power and incredibly sharp sound.  Rare or not, I set the highest audio standards for all my records and this
is up therewith the finest mono "Yellow Submarine" I have ever seen and heard.  An expression was taken from my descriptions
on ebay years ago, but but unlike those token comments, I am including my own treasured mono copy in the same Mint condition.
The opening track on Side 1 follows the chronology of the film, the oldest track on the album from 1966 "Yellow Submarine" starts
the proceeding's.  This side's run-in grooves are also near silent, ultimate vinyl gradings have to be earned and first edition records
are not like not books or antiques.  Perfect sound reproduction from this first pressing, left EMI's pressing plant as a pristine
sounding record is yet another confirmation of the capability of EMI's sound engineers.  I do not regret adding possibly negative
comments concerning the mono mix, on the contrary, I was being blasted by the staggering sound coming  from this record at the
time! Without that I would have been uncomfortable but the factual truth always was, and always will be integral to 60's music in
1969 or in 2016, I must be aware about not writing volumes of text on top of all that preceded this, the part I always love the
most is always the sounds coming from the speakers, the rest is necessary but never functional.  In all the incredible power of
mono, the song that gave "Revolver" some light hearted fun among all the intensity, is being heard in simply stunning sharp edged
audio perfection.  The audio clarity is so perfectly defined every one of the lovely sound effects and backing vocals are crystal
clear sound.  Sound effects included bringing in a bucket of water to the studio, a chain was rattled in the water, but this was
always about infectious melody with sing-along lyrics that appeal to young children through to fully grown up children, or adults
as we are regarded by the children!  That was the true magic of the Beatles, a timeless appeal that leapt across every successive
generation....and connected!   There is no surface sound or static, vital to such a powerful mono record, or any form of distortion
on the very loudest notes.  The mono mix was contemporary to the "White Album," so the bass was massive and gives a wonderful
bottom end to today's stereo equipment.  I guess there lies the real irony of digging so deep into this mono mix, today we enjoy
that from a non valve powered stereo system, yet the same amazing impact is why UK Beatles first pressings are so sought after
worldwide.  Pure silence in the linking grooves allows a perfectly clean entrance to the psychedelic epic, "Only A Northern Song"
in late 1960's mono is a staggering track to experience from a Mint- first pressing, I do mean 'experience and so it should be.
A 1967 "Sgt. Pepper" sessions recording but unused and became an out-take, obviously the mono mix is just stunning and by now
I'm no longer interested in trivial mixing anomalies, if you were sitting in my chair with the volume and audio clarity impacting
in a breathtaking fashion, nothing else matters.  Recorded the 13th February 1967, 9 takes were needed for the extraordinary,
extremely complex psychedelic instrumental backing track, how did this get rejected from the  "Sgt. Pepper" album!  George was
rapidly approaching the time when only one track on an album was out of proportion to his emerging composing genius, irony
surfaces yet again, because in the same 1969, "Abbey Road" finally gave him an equal status to John and Paul as a songwriter.
The following day the vocals were recorded, a tape-to-tape reduction of 'Take 3' was required to vacate two of the stereo tracks
for George to add his superb lead vocals.  In 1967 only 4-track recording was available in Abbey Road studios, that was repeated
three times to achieve the best vocal results, with the best named as 'Take 12.'  George recorded two lead vocals and both were
superimposed onto the backing track completed on the 13th , then 3 mono mixes  were made. There are so many mindless claims  
circulating about the Beatles recordings, I often turn to direct quotes from the most authoritative sources to eliminate lies or to
verify the truth.  It is not true "Only A Northern Song" was recorded hastily in 1968 as a desperate last minute 'filler for the
film soundtrack.  Another complete nonsense from Beatles 'experts' is an orchestra was drafted in for the backing track, but as
this ultra clear record clearly reveals, all you hear was created by the Beatles and George Martin, without any other musicians
being involved.  That was "A Day In The Life" and like that track but without any other input, this was a "Sgt.Pepper" recording
  featuring the Beatles at their very peak of inspiration, it would have fitted onto the 1967 album perfectly. The sound quality is
just incredible, with fantastic clarity from the main theme played on an organ to the amazing multiple layers of mind blowing
psychedelic sound effects.  The mono version has a totally different sound to the 1969 stereo mix, where it originated from was
the original stereo 4-Track recording and could only ever, because George Martin always recorded in stereo right from 1963.
I'm really enjoying my chance to indulge an obsessive hobby of mine, another silent before a perfectly clean intro of an acoustic
guitar, "All Together Now" was the delightful track first heard during the initial journey on the yellow submarine to save the
  population of Pepperland, but it also played out the film when the Beatles made a non-cartoon appearance and told everyone,
  watching in cinema's to, "Leave the theatre singing."  It was originally recorded during the May 1967 "Magical Mystery Tour"
recording sessions, they began as soon as "Sgt. Pepper" was completed. On the 12th May the Beatles began recording at 7 p.m.
and they worked through to 12.30 a.m as was their custom, they only needed nine takes to complete the song on that same night.
The spontaneity was captured with two acoustic guitars, harmonica,bass drum,  triangle, bass guitar and a horn, which for them
at the height of psychedelia, were comparatively basic instruments for a 1967 Beatles recording!  Multiple overdubs and a superb
Paul McCartney lead vocal, with the percussion boosted by strong use of hanclaps, the highly infectious melody became another
fun, sing- along memorable track.  Not only was the intro played on those acoustic guitars immaculately clean, there is literally
no surface sound on the exposed intro or when Paul sings the first part unaccompanied by the other voices.  The powerful sound is
extremely sharp and the mono mix here is outstanding, with all those described instruments in pin point audio definition. You can
hear John's harmonica being playfully blown, way off in the background on the stereo LP version, but really standing out in mono.
Just mentioned handclaps have a 'real life' sound and even as an acoustic track, there is no surface sound during the whole song.
  The linking grooves are completely silent, when I think of the damage I caused to my original copy in 1969 by constantly dropping
a needle here, I still cringe!   Then the cleanest possible intro, an eruption of astoundingly loud bass and piano for the great
"Hey Bulldog".  In mono this is among my all time favourite Beatles tracks, the sheer impact is amazing from a Mint- very first
pressing!  The bass guitar has really massive volume throughout the whole track, then so does every part of this, the wonderful
  recording that more than justified only four new Beatles songs on an album.  This was made at the same time as "Lady Madonna"
in 1968, the time when the Beatles were re-connecting with their rock roots as the psychedelic mists were just starting to clear.
  An almost add-libbed song, with the improvised ending entirely spontaneous, when John Lennon asks Paul,"Do you know anymore?"
Paul howls like a dog, it was all improvised while they recorded the track.  A film of this session exists but the sound was not
on the film,  I cannot recommend the UK mono mix highly enough, or this record!  The sound is just staggering on "Hey Bulldog",
as I experience the mono version delivering a massive punch in just stunning audio clarity. The Beatles arriving at the the peak
of musical genius and creativity is captured on this unbelievable first side,  next up is the sensational "It's All Too Much", an  
ultimate representation of the Beatles psychedelic recordings being off the scale for originality.  It was also part of the May,  
1967 "Magical Mystery Tour" sessions and the recording took place on the 26th May, a reduction mixdown from Take 4, with an
original running time of 8:04 mins was made.  The final mix included editing the length of the track, but collectors of unofficial
sources will no doubt have the "Lost Pepperland Reel" CD with the staggering full length 8 minutes version. This mono mix is just
"too much"!  Such power in the sound, I cannot really put in text, your senses are bombarded by fantastic sounds of pure energy
and spine tingling music. Say what you like about the mono mix, this was sensational stuff, the percussion leaps out the speakers
in simply stunning sound quality, George Harrison's inspired vocals have magnificent sound on one of the very greatest George
Martin production, recording and mixing, the sound is so immense you are just flooded with mind blowing sounds. The sheer clarity
of the mono sound here, takes you right inside the recording itself, I can't praise the sound highly enough.  The long fade-out has  
no surface or needle sound, then at the very end of the track, the only surface sound on the entire record is just a split second,
blink and you miss it! Quite honestly I should never include such minor things on a fantastic condition 1969 rarity, but I always
make sure nothing is conveniently forgotten or missed, to put that into perspective, there is a superbly clean intro to the final  
track that worked so well in the film as the Blue Meanies were being defeated by 'flower power' and the strongest force in the
world, "All You Need Is Love". The mono mix sounds incredible and those as old as me will remember that amazing worldwide,
live 1967 broadcast via the first satellite beaming TV pictures around the globe, as John sang his message of love, this was the
very epitome of the "Summer Of Love" and with the Beatles at the very height of their powers, the song carried a message that is
as true today as 49 years ago.  The audio is just stunning, with the great Lennon vocals set against the George Martin production
that added a very special feel of a timeless quality.  I also remember all the fuss made about releasing the soundtrack and the
accusations that the Beatles were selling their public short in 1969, they wanted to release the new material on an EP, not just
four tracks.  The fifth was the still unreleased 1968 "Across The Universe", an acetate was made with the five tracks and as far
as I know, it remains locked inside EMI's vaults.  EMI vetoed the release and the Beatles had no choice other than accept the new
material would be heard from an album, on reflection I would have wanted that EP and still bought the "Yellow Submarine" album!
I'm sure people today would agree, is there another album with a side brimming with such fantastic music?   No blame can ever be
placed on the Beatles for the format of the album, the legal, contractual side of the film etc.was not under their control and it must  
be remembered Brian Epstein made all those arrangements just before his death in 1967,  I'm just delighted the album was issued,
  a reminder to look out for those invading Blue Meanies!
{Roy}

   

R & M RECORDS.
My lifetime's love of music and records began at a very young age, the arrival of the Beatles and the 1960's decade
  in general had a very profound effect. It was only natural to bring all my first hand experience of collecting vinyl
  into becoming a professional record seller.  Nearly thirty years ago we entered into the wonderful atmosphere
of record fairs with the highest possible standards set. When the Internet became the world's new market place for
  vinyl, in 2001 it was time to join ebay. Those standards were rigidly adhered to as they will always continue to be,
the basics of honesty and integrity were very much part of the era the music I love originated in, so here is our friendly
and very efficient service we are proud to provide;
EVERY RECORD IS FULLY PLAYED AND COMES WITH A 'NO ARGUMENT' MONEY BACK GUARANTEE.
  I USE GOOD OLD COMMON SENSE AS WELL AS A GLOBALLY ACCEPTED GRADING TERMINOLOGY
  FROM THE U.K. "RECORD COLLECTOR PRICE GUIDE" BOOK.
THERE IT CLEARLY STATES "Sound Quality" AFFECTS EVERY GRADING LEVEL AND THAT IS THE ONE
AND ONLY POSSIBLE WAY TO ACCURATELY GRADE RECORDS. i.e. COMBINING A STRICT VISUAL
INSPECTION WITH VERY CLOSELY LISTENING TO EVERY SECOND, UNLESS PERHAPS IN THE CASE
OF GENUINELY UNPLAYED VINYL.  EVEN THEN WE STILL TAKE FULL RESPONSIBILITY FOR A RECORD
WHEN A CUSTOMER RECEIVES EITHER A SEALED OR AN UNPLAYED RECORD.
 
  We take 100% responsibility after an item has been posted and offer our fullest support in the event of any problems.

"There Are No Problems, Only Solutions" (John Lennon)

MY DESCRIPTIONS WILL ALWAYS BE 100% HONEST AND TOTALLY ACCURATE ON ALL GRADINGS
FROM 'V.G.' ( VERY GOOD), TO THE ULTIMATE 'MINT' CONDITION.
ANY QUESTIONS ON OUR ITEMS ARE WELCOMED AND WILL BE PROMPTLY REPLIED TO.
 
WE ARE FULLY EXPERIENCED AT SHIPPING WORLDWIDE AND NO EFFORT IS SPARED TO PROTECT
RECORDS AND COVERS ETC.  WE WELCOME BIDDERS FROM ANY COUNTRY IN THE WORLD.
ALL RECORDS ARE REMOVED FROM THEIR SLEEVES AND PLACED INTO NEW PROTECTIVE CARD
SLEEVES AND THEN PLACED INTO NEW, HEAVYWEIGHT PLASTIC OUTER SLEEVES.
THE GREATEST ATTENTION IS PAID TO MAKING THE PACKAGING EXTREMELY STRONG & SECURE.
EVERY POSSIBLE EFFORT IS MADE TO ENSURE A SAFE DELIVERY AND WE ONLY USE THE VERY BEST
QUALITY PACKAGING MATERIALS, THE COST OF THE ITEM IS IMMATERIAL, EVERY RECORD IS
TREATED EXACTLY THE SAME.
WE DO NOT TREAT POSTAGE AS A MONEY MAKING PROJECT, POSTAGE IS LESS THAN COST, USING
ONLY PROFESSIONALLY PACKED BOXES WITH SUBSTANTIAL PROTECTIVE PACKAGING THAT DOES
WEIGH A LITTLE EXTRA.
UNDER PAYPAL & EBAY'S GUIDELINES, ALL RECORDS WILL BE SENT VIA A FULLY INSURED TRACKABLE
SERVICE.
We have kept all our charges at the same level for years now, but due to the Post Office's new price increases, regretfully we
will have to increase the cost of LP's, however, singles will remain unchanged.  Ebay were aware of that happening and have
  increased their minimum postal cost for LP's to £7.00, that figure has been enforced by the UK Post Office and it will become
our UK First Class, Recorded Delivery cost for albums up to the value of £46.  A temporary reduction this week means we can
now post LP's for £5, but who knows how long before the Post Office return to £7?
For LP's valued above £46, the cost will be £9, we are unhappy about either increase but our high standard of packaging has meant
in 13 years of ebay trading, there has not been one record damaged, we are determined to maintain that in the present and future.
IN THE UK RECORDS UP TO THE VALUE OF £46 WILL BE SENT RECORDED DELIVERY, OVER £46 WILL BE
SENT SPECIAL DELIVERY.
  FOR THE REST OF THE WORLD ALL RECORDS WILL BE SENT VIA 'INTERNATIONAL SIGNED FOR.'

POSTAGE  COST FOR LP's
UK: UP TO VALUE OF £46, FIRST CLASS RECORDED DELIVERY  £5.00
UK: OVER VALUE OF £46, FULLY INSURED SPECIAL DELIVERY £9.00
EUROPE: FULLY INSURED VIA INTERNATIONAL SIGNED FOR  £15.00
USA,JAPAN & REST OF THE WORLD FULLY INSURED VIA INTERNATIONAL SIGNED FOR £20.00
POSTAGE COST FOR EP's & 7"
UK: UP TO THE VALUE OF £46 FIRST CLASS RECORDED DELIVERY £3.00
UK: OVER THE VALUE OF £46 FULLY INSURED SPECIAL DELIVERY £6.00
EUROPE: AIR MAIL VIA INTERNATIONAL SIGNED FOR £10.00
USA, JAPAN ETC. AIRMAIL VIA INTERNATIONAL SIGNED FOR £12.00


PAYMENT DETAILS.
WE WILL SEND ALL WINNING BIDDERS AN INVOICE WITH THE FULL PAYMENT AND POSTAL DETAILS,
AS NEAR TO THE AUCTION ENDING AS POSSIBLE.
OUR AIM IS TO MAKE YOUR PURCHASE SMOOTH AND TROUBLE FREE.
FOR UK BUYERS;
WE ACCEPT:  PAYPAL, CHEQUES, POSTAL ORDERS & BANK WIRES.
FOR OVERSEAS BUYERS;
WE ACCEPT:  PAYPAL, INTERNATIONAL MONEY ORDERS IN POUNDS STERLING ONLY.
OR BANK TO BANK WIRE TRANSFERS.
WE WILL NOT MAKE FALSE STATEMENTS ON CUSTOMS DECLARATION FORMS AND WILL ALWAYS
CONDUCT ALL OF OUR BUSINESS WITH TOTAL HONESTY.
AS MUCH AS WE SYMPATHISE WITH THE WAY SOME COUNTRIES CHARGE SUCH HEAVY IMPORT
DUTIES, WE WILL NOT LIE.

  Pay me with PayPal.
I don't charge my buyers extra!