BEATLES Revolver LP VERY1st UK PRESS 1966 IN RARE STEREO ONLY 4 5 PLAYS Nr MINT - rare vinyl collector item


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BEATLES Revolver LP VERY1st UK PRESS 1966 IN RARE STEREO~ONLY 4/5 PLAYS~Nr MINT

BEATLES Revolver LP VERY1st UK PRESS 1966 IN RARE STEREOONLY 45 PLAYSNr MINT
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Auction Details:
Code ID
#12272
Ebay Item #
252294251608
Sold Price
$952.41
Bids
22
Auction End date
27 Feb 2016
Seller Location
Chelmsford, Essex

Item Description

Turn off your mind, relax and float down stream,
  It is not dying , it is not dying.
 
  Lay down all thought, surrender to the void,
  It is shining, it is shining.
 
  That you may see the meaning of within,
  It is being, it is being.
 
  That love is all and love is everyone,
  It is knowing, it is knowing.
 
  That ignorance and hate may mourn the dead,
  It is believing, it is believing.
 
  But listen to the colour of your dreams,
  It is not living, it is not living.
 
  Or play the game, existence to the end.
  Of the beginning, of the beginning,
  Of the beginning, of the beginning,
  Of the beginning....

BEATLES: "Revolver" LP.  AUTHENTIC VERY FIRST UK PRESSING IN RARE STEREO, ISSUED 13th AUGUST,1966.
How exciting to have a superb first UK pressing of "Revolver," in the sensory, first made true Stereo mix, to play and describe .
  1966 was very much a predominantly Mono stronghold, no different to the 1963 "Please Please Me" Stereo albums, EMI only pressed
  in very small batches, obviously preparing the Stereo and Mono mothers right at the beginning of manufacturing. As this genuine very
  first Stereo record's pair of mother digits indicate, very low Stereo mothers were required and made until the end of the year,
  Side 1 from the second mother and Side 2 from the first mother.  This week I was once explaining how mistaken double digits at
  9 o'clock in the run-out grooves meant, for a first pressing of the 1963 "I Want To Hold Your Hand" single with zero's after the
  first digits on both sides. No record ever exceeded single mothers, not even the huge selling Beatles singles ever reached double
  mothers.  A mistake regularly found in the 1960's & 1970's decades, I always state I only take the first digit stamped as the
as the one intended, or the first digit was crossed out or over stamped.  Well, this "Revolver" has that exact scenario, on Side 1
  a '2' digit was mistakenly stamped due to the other side actually requiring that setting on the stamping machine, the error was
  seen and the '2' was indeed over stamped with an 'X' or maybe 'Z'.  Then underneath the intended '1' was stamped very clearly, it
  seemed a good opportunity to show that, so out of interest I included a close-up picture of the crossed out '2' &  the '1' digit
  signifying the first mother.  These genuine very first pressings in Stereo would have been prepared and pressing July, 1966 for
  the August release, does that matter? Yes, very much so, because the Stereo "Revolver" pressings were made in such small numbers
  they were made with similar Parlophone label and text right up to mid-1969.  It is easy to identify the genuine July, 1966 very
  first pressings from late 1966, 1967, 1968 & 1969, I will give full very first pressing details below, first I will deal with second
pressings as I have started to discuss them and they were available in late 1966 and early 1967.
The following late November - December,1966 & early 1967 "Revolver" stereo pressings, are easily identified, in that period all
Parlophone records had the label's 'Stereo' silver lettering in the largest size ever seen in the 60's.  For example, the Beatles
album released then was "A Collection Of Beatles Oldies", all Stereo first pressing had the large lettering and a different font in,
Times Roman. Including  the Mono records, 'Mono' was not printed on the labels because the vast majority were expected to be and
indeed were Mono.  That applied to any back catalogue Stereo pressings, the Beatles album positively being re-pressed then, was
"Rubber Soul", the copies with large 'Stereo' lettering are often misquoted as '1965 first pressings.'
YELLOW & BLACK PARLOPHONE LABEL: PCS 7009.
 
MAITRIX: YEX 605 - 1 / YEX 606 - 1
The '-1 /- 1' end digits were the starting point for the pre-release stereo records, the first mono records are the best known
  of all the Beatles albums, the Stereo records did not initially have an alternative mix of "Tomorrow Never Knows."
EMI STAMPING CODES:  RO 2 / RO 1*
  With the described error, crossing out and correction which is available to view in my pictures, there will be other first Stereo
  pressings with the same error because of the nature of vinyl manufacturing.
 
  THE DISTINCTIVELY TEXTURED VERY FIRST PRESSING YELLOW & BLACK LABELS HAVE:
1.) "STEREO" IN BLOCK SILVER SMALL/ STANDARD LETTERING
Unlike the second pressing in late 1966, first pressings were in Sans Serif Arial font
2.) THE "Sold In UK" TEXT
3.) "Gramophone Co. Ltd."ON THE RIMS.
 
4.) THE UK TAX CODE, 'KT' IS EMBOSSED ON SIDE 2, EITHER SIDE OF THE SPINDLE HOLE.
NOW THE LABEL TEXT EXCLUSIVE TO THE AUGUST,1966 VERY FIRST PRESSINGS:
5.) SIDE 2 HAS THE FIRST, I STRESS FIRST, MISTAKEN TITLE "Doctor Robert" MISPRINTED AS "Dr. Robert"
  I regret revealing that when I joined ebay, it is so misunderstood and completely mixed up with all re-issues now, it has become
  meaningless.  Just like the ridiculous misunderstood omition of "Her Majesty" in 1969, now, amateur record sellers believe that
  song title was supposed to be printed on the "Abbey Road" cover.  Bar coded and Picture Disc copies are being sold as 'rare' due
  to not having "Her Majesty"printed on the covers.... it never was in any decade!  
  The one and only relevance of "Doctor Robert" is on the very first pressings in Mono and Stereo, both are extremely rare due to
  the UK Stereo format in 1966 and because the very first Mono pressings having an alternate mix of "Tomorrow Never Knows."
As the same error over the incorrect spelling of "Dr. Robert" was never corrected on the back cover, so printers continued to
  repeat the same mistake on the labels in every decade... just like the "Abbey Road" cover.   Nothing I say now will stop such
  ignorance and why I regret placing this and many other specific mistakes, exclusively connected to the very first pressings.
 
  (6.)  BOTH SIDE LABELS PRESENT THE TRACK LISTING ON ON INDIVIDUAL LINES.
  Later pressings overlapped the longer titles onto the next lines, please refer to my label pictures for this and the next and
  final label text item.
 
  7.) THE SONG TITLES ARE IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWED BY THE COMPOSING CREDIT, THEN THE LEAD VOCALIST.
  For example;
  "Tax Man" (Harrison) - George Harrison All later pressings reversed the composer(s) and lead vocalist after the track titles.
  "Tax Man" George Harrison - (Harrison)
 
  Once again, very similar to UK "Abbey Road" cover, on the back of the "Revolver" cover, track listing has the same format of
   the composer(s) followed by the lead vocalist as these very first pressing labels.  When the labels were changed on the re-issues
  the cover remained unchanged like the misspelling of "Dr. Robert", hence the "Abbey Road" comparison.  Neither cover was ever
  amended, I know I will be ignored again, but I do not write descriptions for record sellers, this is info is for collector's.
  Individual printing details pertinent to authentic first pressings do not exist in isolation, it is always the combination of
  several items collectively, therefore the first pressing of "Revolver" in both Mono and Stereo cannot be mistaken....but as I
   write, several record sellers on ebay etc. will be misrepresenting blatant and obvious reissues in ignorance and deliberately.
 
  ORIGINAL AUGUST, 1966, EMI INNER SLEEVE IN HARDLY USED, UNAGED MINT- CONDITION.
Just a light record impression, a perfectly stored cover like this, without any stains or discolouration, has every chance of an
  unaged inner sleeve.  Especially being without the glue absorption discolouration poly- lined inner's usually suffered from.
  By 1966, all the remaining earlirer 60's 'Use Emitex' tracing paper lined inner sleeves had been used up and plain white, curved
  edges inner's were introduced, the only printing on the front rim is; "Made In Great Britain" and the Patent Number.
 
FIRST ISSUE 1966 'Garrod & Lofthouse', STEREO FLIPBACK EDGE COVER, WITH THE TEXT, "Patents Pending,"
PRINTED  ON THE BACK'S BOTTOM FLIPBACK EDGE.  IT WILL BE INTERESTING TO EXAMINE THESE FIRST STEREO
COVERS BECAUSE BETWEEN 1965 AND AUGUST 1966, GREAT DIFFERENCES WERE MADE TO THE BACK PANEL.
In August, 1965, the first  Stereo pressings of "Help!" had Stereo record record playing information set inside a box, as favoured
  by EMI in the first half of the 1960's, in December,1965 by mistake or deliberation, "Rubber Soul" had that information omitted.
  Next in line in August, '66, "Revolver" broke with all the traditions and had the Stereo records info printed outside a box and on
  individual long lines above the bottom flipback edge, in such tiny text it's extremely difficult to read, perhaps why nobody has
  noticed it's presence and commented about the uniqueness, in terms of a 1966 first pressing's features.  Why people selling
  re-issues have to involve such unique additions when first introduced on first pressings, is a  mystery to me, what happened in
  later decades had no bearing at all on what preceded them, or you might  as well claim rarities & differences by virtue of having
  something like a bar code!  The word 'Doctor/ Dr.' comes to mind here but not now!  Then only months later in December,1966 EMI
  re-instated the boxed Stereo info format on the back of Stereo "A Collection Of Oldies" first pressings, last seen in August, 1965,
like this "Revolver" format, that always began with;
"IMPORTANT. This record is intended for use only on special Stereophonic reproducers.  If you are doubtful......etc. etc."
In June,1967, with "Sgt.Pepper's" lavish artwork, the complete lack of any Stereo record details was most likely connected with
the nature of the cover itself, the Stereo box was far from redundant, well almost!   "The White Album" had the same scenario as
  "Sgt.Pepper's" gatefold cover, 'artwork taking priority over technical warning's'.  January,1969 it returned, but with the sides
of the box missing on the Stereo "Yellow Submarine" LP's, leaving off the top and the bottom line, by now it was edging towards
mono being deemed doomed to continue into the 1970's decade, EMI introduced a Mono info record playing text for the first time on
the mono "Yellow Submarine" cover, once again set inside the same side-less 'box.' For the time period between the 1965 "Help!"
and the 1966 "Collection Of Oldies", making the open long line format fond on Stereo first pressings of"Revolver" unique to this
cover alone during the whole of the 1960's decade.  There is no point looking for a logical reason because it was just the way it
happened, by late 1969 - early 1970, neither 'Stereo' or Mono' were printed on the front top right corners.
THE COVER WAS BARELY USED, EVEN IN 1966, THE LAMINATED FRONT IS EXTREMELY CLOSE TO BEING THE ORIGINAL
OFF- WHITE OF THE MONO & STEREO FIRST EDITION COVERS.  
I cannot not name a "Revolver" first issue cover having a pure white background, because it never was pure white, more off white
like the first issue 1968 "White Album" gatefold covers.  Virtually every 1960's "Revolver" covers developed  over large laminate
edge lines on the front left edge meeting the spine.  With average handling, they cracked open and nasty yellow/brown stains bled
into the cover like veins, often from the edges as well.  This is one of the few I have ever seen without a solitary edge line, a
very rare cover without the ugly stained stripes that ruin the wonderful black and white artwork, regardless of Mono or Stereo,
the same applies.  I must include that when grading the cover because of how lovingly handled and stored this was, while being
aware 1966 is not 50 years ago!  Like the record, this cover was only used four/five times, so all I have to describe comes under
holding a heavyweight record only, allowing for the merest rubbing to the matt back in a very small section.   Middle, far left
behind John Lennon;s head  in the studio photo, directly where the record was resting for 50 years, I did say small and it is faint.
Even the pointed spine's extreme tips are unworn, so are the pair of right side corners, just the slightest standing pressure to
the bottom pair, too minor to mention. Other to that, there is not an item wear related from use, a really beautiful looking rare
first edition, Stereo cover.   The front top right corner has 'Stereo' is in the standard 'small' size lettering that followed 1964's
  reduction from middle size lettering when compared to the 1963 largest 'Mono' and 'Stereo 'black lettering, a close up picture is
  among the photo's.   The most common Beatles Stereo UK covers in general are from the late 1969 - early 1970 period, by then
  Stereo had became an accepted format, they also came in flipback covers, but those do not have 'Stereo'printed on the front top
  corner, there was no need to when Mono was made redundant. The front ultra thick lamination still has the original 1966, mirror
  like glossy shine over the white background to Klaus Voorman's superb artwork, that is really bright, without the discolouration
  that affected nearly all mono and stereo original covers.  The mega heavyweight record's shape has left only a reasonably mild
  impression, so there are none of the large laminate wrinkles and creases common to the cover,  just the usual few laminate lines
  that naturally form over all of those decades.  They are edge lines only and a natural occurrence, therefore completely unrelated
  to wear but as I said this is not suffering from severe staining, common to all light colour laminated covers, but "Revolver" was
  the album cover to suffer the most and I have a theory for that.   EMI introduced plain white inner's, so the heavyweight records
  no longer had a thick lining acting as a further barrier against the panels,the sides and of course against the spine. Previously
  a double fold on the vertical sides of the previously lined type, referred to as the "Use Emitex" inner's.  I am not looking for
  excuses for the excessive staining on most or the normally excessive rubbing on the black matt back panel, genuine 1966 stereo
  covers are rare enough not to require that,  I deal with facts and include such natural events in my grading.  I will stress the
  spine titles are perfectly clear and to prove how lovingly stored this has been, both of the spine's pointed endings or the left side
  corners are unworn, that alone is a major rarity!
 
This is a really beautiful looking cover and I strongly recommend seeing it for yourself in my pictures, taken in natural sunlight,
  not the false white a camera flash creates.  The front has unfaded, jet black ink on the artwork, including in that jet black colour,
   the "Stereo" block lettering, against the white colour, a superb contrast.
The flipback edges are all perfectly and neatly stuck down, in very sound, strong condition, with only a few tiny laminate lines
that once again naturally form from the standing pressure and holding a record, which was the purpose of the cover and it has
  protected the precious vinyl inside.
  Taken as a whole entity, a rare and really beautiful cover with all described here attributable to forming naturally over the long
  lifetime, I feel guilty downgrading it because the one previous owner could not have done any more, my grading should not involve
  'Excellent' but I will still use common sense here.
  THE COVER IS IN A MINIMUM OF EXCELLENT+++ / NEAR MINT CONDITION, MY EMPHASIS FALLS ON 'NEAR MINT.'
 
ONLY PLAYED FOUR / FIVE TIMES TIMES, AS SEEN ON THE IMMACULATE LABELS, EVEN THE EMBOSSED 'KT' LETTERS
ARE UNWORN AND HAVE THE THIN BLACK PAPER AS NEW.  THE GLOSSY VINYL IS NOT SCRATCHED, ANY HANDLING
IS FEATHER LIGHT AND NEAR INVISIBLE.  THE TRUE STEREO SOUND IS JUST STUNNING, WITHOUT ONE CRACKLE OR
SURFACE SOUND ON THE ENTIRE RECORD, INCLUDING EVERY TRACK GAP, ABSOLUTELY PERFECT SOUND ON EVERY
SECOND IS VERY RARE FOR A 1966 FIRST PRESSING OF "Revolver." MY GRADING HAS TO BE NEAR MINT CONDITION.

SIDE 1
"Taxman" (George Harrison)
"Eleanor Rigby"
"I'm Only Sleeping"
"Love You To"(George Harrison)
"Here, There And Everywhere"
"Yellow Submarine"
"She Said She Said"
 SIDE 2
"Good Day Sunshine"
"And Your Bird Can Sing"
"For No One"
"Doctor Robert"
"I Want To Tell You"(George Harrison)
"Got To Get You Into My Life"
"Tomorrow Never Knows"
   All Songs written By John Lennon & Paul McCartney, Except Where Credited To George Harrison.
Recorded 6th April / 21st June 1966, At Abbey Road Studios.


The recording sessions for the Beatles album regarded by most as one of, if not the the greatest album of all time, began on the
6th April, 1966.  The first track recorded in Abbey Road studio for "Revolver," an album that would forever change the concept
  of popular music, had an unassuming title of "Mark One".  This was a recording of such immensity, that a simple 'x' would have
sufficed until some kind of retrospective examination of what exactly had quite been laid down during one of the most inspired
opening to a recording session in all of rock's long and illustrious history periods.  At least "Sgt. Pepper"/ "Strawberry Fields"
had something this extraordinary to follow, but prior to April 1966, nothing had gone this far and deep into pure psychedelia.
  "Mark One" could have been a statement of intent, that was the song title given to mark the tape spool box, or as that is known
  a 'working title' given until an actual finalised song title has been arrived at.  That historic day spent in Studio 2, the Beatles
  recorded three takes that would form the basic track of what would  become the most  mind blowing recording ever heard in
or before 1966, or come to that, still until this very day.  The genius of John Lennon stepped into the void and returned with
something that would alter the way recording studios had previously been used, the visionary sounds in Lennon's mind would
be translated into astonishing sounds by George Martin and EMI's sound engineers. "Tomorrow Never Knows" was where the
Beatles' music was always heading towards, because "Revolver" was not just an isolated album that happened by pure chance,
their music evolved while the Beatles made a staggering progression through the 'Golden 1960's' with a positive belief nothing
was impossible.....unless you believed it was!   Of course that era's experimentation's with mind expanding drugs and music as
the essential ingredient, was a major factor, but the very young John Lennon was inspired by Lewis Carroll's books which were
full of hallucinogenic images and references, Alice was into taking pills right from the opening chapter!  To have recorded such
ground breaking rsounds required a real visionary musical genius, all of the most incredible studio created sound effects alone
would not have elevated "Revolver" to it's lofty heights, this was as much the Beatles gifted ability to write unique new songs
and to demand new frameworks to set them in.   Accompanying the inspired songwriting and musicianship was also the growing
  dissatisfaction with conventional methods of recording records and expressing a state of mind.  They had now gone beyond just
adding a little reverb and overdubbing extra pieces, by 1966 they were pushing very hard against apparent limitations of 1960's
studios, as it turned out they  were far from that!  This is where George Martin was to play a vital role in translating all their
ingenious ideas and concepts.
Although this year "Revolver" reaches it's 50th Anniversary, the album is revered by all age groups and new generations, when
it was first released, "Revolver" was hailed as the greatest album from the particular 60's period when astounding records came
out on an almost weekly basis.  Since 1966, the recording techniques and advances with technology have made that look like the
  Stone Age, yet all the years later, the only way to hear this album in the purest and truest sound, is not from all those fifty years
  of amazing scientific advances in technology, but from original 50 years old vinyl!  For the first time in my life I do not feel
  an overwhelming compulsion to rush out and buy  latest re-masters, I will get round to them, but I have once too often tasted the
  bitter disappointment of all those promises failing to do anymore than squeeze the very essence out of the music's magical feel
  and sound.   Besides, there is hardly a few days that pass without hearing the staggering sound of mint original UK pressings of
  Beatles singles, EP's and LP's.  How on earth could anyone ever improve on the staggering, senses tingling  sounds of this true
  stereo first pressing of "Revolver"?   This is psychedelia unleashed from an unworn record that is as potent today as it was in
  1966.  Not the empty promises ebay sellers tag onto the overplayed worn out vinyl, I am talking about genuine four to five only
  plays and even quoting 4 /5 plays for both sides was over counted, that actually includes the traces of the removal, but I always
count all traces.  Such heavily played records cannot produce the kind of audio perfection I just heard from this record, this is
indeed capable of blowing away any CD for sound and sound textures, as recorded, mixed and mastered in Abbey Road.  This is
an LP with the delicacy and beauty of, "Here, There And Everywhere", "I'm Only Sleeping", "Love You To" and "For No One", to
name just three reasons for how essential the condition of the vinyl.   Without wishing to sound in any way conceited about our
British Beatles records, the fact is only the UK Mono and Stereo originals hold the true sound of the finished item, as intended
by both the band and George Martin.  The 1980, USA "Rarities" LP is all about the Beatles tracks in alternate mixes or formats,
 a fantastic and major album for all to hear, the USA sleeve notes for every track are mostly connected to the tracks concerned
  being original UK mixes, previously unavailable on the Capitol Records label.  America received  an earlier different version of
  "I'm Only Sleeping" to the UK version, I will shortly explain why the UK "Revolver" version is so different, the British version
is described on the back cover of the USA "Rarities" like this;

"The British stereo version was chosen for "Rarities" because verses were re-arranged and strange guitar sounds were inserted."
 were inserted."

Those 'strange sounds and re-arranged verses' were in fact the Beatles and George Martin's finished tracks, even today in America
there are many, many Beatles fans who have yet to hear one the greatest albums ever made, as it was intended by the artists and
record producer to be heard.  That applies to UK vinyl re-issues and....as I have heard up until now, the dreadful CD versions that
are light years apart from this, the original 1966 UK true stereo mix.  I far prefer the bootlegs because nobody interfered with the
sound or mixes on those CD's, they were straight Master tape transfers, the most stereo studio out-takes famous were on a double
CD titled, "Turn Me On Dead Man", as transferred by a very respected EMI sound engineer, John Barrett, not intended for bootlegs but
  an abandoned "Beatles Rarities" project in the mid-1980's pre-"Anthology." You also get to hear different takes etc. "Revolver"
  was issued in the UK 13th August,1966, in both mono and true stereo,  a No.1 album that spent 34 consecutive weeks in the charts,
  over eight months it meant an amazing amount were sold, out of those the vast majority were the mono records. For anyone just
  getting into the 60's or just the Beatles original vinyl, 1966 in Britain and around the world, mono reigned supreme, stereo was
  very much a format for a very small minority and it remained so for another three years. Stereo LP's sold in such small numbers,
   the original pressings are extremely rare now and as I constantly say, no original standard issue UK record is so rare you have
  to suffer hearing their great music in appalling sound quality, they were not pressed like that!
     
  During the long and enjoyable years we spent trading at record fairs, I was always answering the same question about this LP;
  "Which is the best way to hear the UK "Revolver", in mono or stereo?"
  I could only answer from a personal basis, I bought "Revolver" in mono on the day it was issued and when I first heard the then
  current stereo version in the early 1970's, I was not impressed at all.  By then the stereo re-panning had been taken a huge step
  away from the true sound of 1960's music, especially from this magical psychedelic period.   When I first heard the 1966 stereo
"Revolver" LP, I was simply amazed at the sound and the many variations for the individual songs, in direct comparison to the
  mono versions.   I commented on this same subject recently for a first pressing of "Sgt. Pepper" and "Revolver" is really just as
  essential in the original stereo mix.  I love both formats equally, in my opinion as a Beatles collector, as those differences in the
sound and the mix are on such a magnificent works of art, I believe we're really lucky to have the two such different Abbey Road
  Master Tape variations.  Aside from the Beatles album's, there are so many great 60's records that did not offer a choice for the
  formats, e.g. the first three Rolling Stones LP's were in mono only and it was not until 1966 when they recorded in true stereo,
  for "Aftermath."    1960's Beatles Stereo UK LP's are so unlike any of the later decade's stereo pressings, not just for their stereo
  panning effects, but for the  sheer power and a 'feel' that accurately reflected the era the music was conceived and recorded in.
  To hear the sound of George Martin's True Stereo mix is a really amazing way to experience "Revolver", listening to tracks such
  as "Tomorrow Never knows," is something I most certainly would not want to be without.  The perfect solution is to have a mono
  and stereo original "Revolver" and the same thing applies to every Beatles original stereo pressing, however far back you go.